Life Events That May Have Tax Consequences for Seniors and Retirees

Many significant life events often come with a related tax consequence. Here are some issues that may be facing seniors and retirees with links to more information on their tax impact.

elder law nycAs listed by the IRS

Planning for Retirement?

Mutual Fund Distributions

Job Loss or Starting a New Career or Job

Persons with Disabilities

Decedents

  • Publication 559, Survivors, Executors and Administrators
  • Form 56, Notice Concerning Fiduciary Relationship
  • Form 1310, Statement of Person Claiming Refund Due a Deceased Taxpayer
  • Form 4810, Request For Prompt Assessment Under Internal Revenue Code Section 6501(d)

Divorce or Separations

Marriage

Disaster

Moving?

Did You Receive a Notice?

Filing or Paying Late – Information Taxpayers Should Know!

Many people today need more time to prepare their federal tax return. They may want to consider an  for time to file. However, extension of time to file a return does not grant any extension of time to pay a tax liability.

Additional Assistance

News Releases and Tax Tips

Regards,

Brian

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.

www.RaphanLaw.com

Tips for Seniors in Preparing their Taxes

As April 15th is around the corner, the IRS has these tips for seniors preparing their taxes:

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Current research indicates that individuals are likely to make errors when preparing their tax returns. The following tax tips were developed to help you avoid some of the common errors dealing with the standard deduction for seniors, the taxable amount of Social Security benefits, and the Credit for the Elderly and Disabled. In addition, you’ll find links below to helpful publications as well as information on how to obtain free tax assistance.

Standard Deduction for Seniors – If you do not itemize your deductions, you can get a higher standard deduction amount if you and/or your spouse are 65 years old or older. You can get an even higher standard deduction amount if either you or your spouse is blind. (See Form 1040 and Form 1040A instructions.)

Taxable Amount of Social Security Benefits -When preparing your return, be especially careful when you calculate the taxable amount of your Social Security. Use the Social Security benefits worksheet found in the instructions for IRS Form 1040 and Form 1040A, and then double-check it before you fill out your tax return. See Publication 915Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits.


Credit for the Elderly or Disabled – You must file using Form 1040 or Form 1040A to receive the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled. You cannot get the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled if you file using Form 1040EZ. Be sure to apply for the Credit if you qualify; please read below for details.

Who Can Take the Credit: The Credit is based on your age, filing status and income. You may be able to take the Credit if:

Age: You and/or your spouse are either 65 years or older; or under age 65 years old and are permanently and totally disabled.

AND 

Filing Status: Your income on Form 1040 line 38 is less than $17,500, $20,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies), $25,000 (married filing jointly and both qualify), or $12,500 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year).

And, the non-taxable part of your Social Security or other nontaxable pensions, annuities or disability income is less than $5,000 (single, head of household, or qualifying widow/er with diependent child); $5,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies); $7,500 (married filing jointly and both qualify); or $3,750 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse the entire year).

Calculating the Credit: Use Schedule R (Form 1040 or 1040A), Credit for the Elderly or Disabled, to figure the amount of the credit.  See the instructions for Schedule R (Forms 1040 or 1040A) if you want the IRS to figure this credit for you.

Also see Publications 524 (Credit for the Elderly or Disabled); and 554 (Tax Guide for Seniors). 

Free IRS Tax Return Preparation –  IRS-sponsored volunteer tax assistance programs offer free tax help to seniors and to low- to moderate-income people who cannot prepare their own tax returns.

If you have recently done some Estate Planning, check with us and your accountant to make sure you are filing your returns properly.

FREE ESTATE PLANNING GUIDE

Regards, Brian

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

Can I Give My Kids $14,000 a Year?

If you have it to give, you certainly can, but there may be consequences should you apply for Medicaid long-term care coverage within five years after each gift.

medicaid planning

The $14,000 figure is the amount of the current gift tax exclusion (for 2014 and 2015), meaning that any person who gives away $14,000 or less to any one individual does not have to report the gift to the IRS, and you can give this amount to as many people as you like.  If you give away more than $14,000 to any one person (other than your spouse), you will have to file a gift tax return.  However, this does not necessarily mean you’ll pay a gift tax.  You’ll have to pay a tax only if your reportable gifts total more than $5.43 million (2015 figure) during your lifetime.

Many people believe that if they give away an amount equal to the current $14,000 annual gift tax exclusion, this gift will be exempted from Medicaid’s five-year look-back at transfers that could trigger a waiting period for benefits.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

The gift tax exclusion is an IRS rule, and this IRS rule has nothing to do with Medicaid’s asset transfer rules. While the $14,000 that you gave to your grandchild this year will be exempt from any gift tax, Medicaid will still count it as a transfer that could make you ineligible for nursing home benefits for a certain amount of time should you apply for them within the next five years.  You may be able to argue that the gift was not made to qualify you for Medicaid, but proving that is an uphill battle.

If you think there is a chance you will need Medicaid coverage of long-term care in the foreseeable future, see your elder law attorney before starting a gifting plan.

For more on Medicaid’s asset transfer rules, click here.

Regards,

Brian A. Raphan

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.  7 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001  212-268-8200 

http://www.RaphanLaw.com

Tips for Seniors in Preparing their Taxes:

IRS Logo

From the IRS: Tips for Seniors in Preparing their Taxes:

Current research indicates that individuals are likely to make errors when preparing their tax returns. The following tax tips were developed to help you avoid some of the common errors dealing with the standard deduction for seniors, the taxable amount of Social Security benefits, and the Credit for the Elderly and Disabled. In addition, you’ll find links below to helpful publications as well as information on how to obtain free tax assistance.

Standard Deduction for Seniors – If you do not itemize your deductions, you can get a higherstandard deduction amount if you and/or your spouse are 65 years old or older. You can get an even higher standard deduction amount if either you or your spouse is blind. (See Form 1040 and Form 1040A instructions.)

Taxable Amount of Social Security Benefits -When preparing your return, be especially careful when you calculate the taxable amount of your Social Security. Use the Social Security benefits worksheet found in the instructions for IRS Form 1040 and Form 1040A, and then double-check it before you fill out your tax return. See Publication 915Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits.


Credit for the Elderly or Disabled – You must file using Form 1040 or Form 1040A to receive the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled. You cannot get the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled if you file using Form 1040EZ. Be sure to apply for the Credit if you qualify; please read below for details.

Who Can Take the Credit: The Credit is based on your age, filing status and income. You may be able to take the Credit if:

Age: You and/or your spouse are either 65 years or older; or under age 65 years old and are permanently and totally disabled.

AND 

Filing Status: Your income on Form 1040 line 38 is less than $17,500, $20,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies), $25,000 (married filing jointly and both qualify), or $12,500 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year).

And, the non-taxable part of your Social Security or other nontaxable pensions, annuities or disability income is less than $5,000 (single, head of household, or qualifying widow/er with diependent child); $5,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies); $7,500 (married filing jointly and both qualify); or $3,750 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse the entire year).

 

Calculating the Credit: Use Schedule R (Form 1040 or 1040A), Credit for the Elderly or Disabled, to figure the amount of the credit.  See the instructions for Schedule R (Forms 1040 or 1040A) if you want the IRS to figure this credit for you.

Also see Publications 524 (Credit for the Elderly or Disabled); and 554 (Tax Guide for Seniors). 

Free IRS Tax Return Preparation –  IRS-sponsored volunteer tax assistance programs offer free tax help to seniors and to low- to moderate-income people who cannot prepare their own tax returns.

Other Helpful Publications

  • Publication 907Tax Highlights for Persons with Disabilities
  • Publication 17Your Federal Income Tax
  • Publication 3966, Living and Working with Disabilities