8 Things Seniors Should Remember at Tax Time

April 15th is approaching and it is time to begin crossing T’s and dotting I’s in preparation for paying taxes. As tax time draws near, you want to make sure you file all the proper forms and take all deductions you’re entitled to. Following are some things to keep in mind as you prepare your tax form.

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  • Gifts. Did you give away any money this year? The gift tax can be very confusing. If you gave away more than $14,000 in 2015, you will have to file a Form 709, the gift tax return. This does not necessarily mean you will owe taxes on the money, however. Click here for more information.
  • Medical Expenses. Many types of medical expenses are tax deductible, from hospital stays to hearing aids. To claim the deduction, your medical expenses have to be more than 10 percent of your adjusted gross income.  (For taxpayers 65 and older, this threshold will be 7.5 percent through 2016.) This includes all out-of-pocket costs for prescriptions (including deductibles and co-pays) and Medicare Part B and Part C and Part D premiums. (Medicare Part B premiums are usually deducted out of your Social Security benefits, so be sure to check your 1099 for the amount.) You can only deduct medical expenses you paid during the year, regardless of when the services were provided, and medical expenses are not deductible if they are reimbursable by insurance. Click here for more information.
  • Parental Deduction. If you are caring for your mother or father, you may be able to claim your parent as a dependent on your income taxes. This would allow you to get an exemption $4,000 (in 2015) for him or her. Click here for more information.
  • Long-Term Care Insurance Premiums. Premiums for “qualified” long-term care policies are treated as an unreimbursed medical expense. Long-term care insurance premiums are deductible for the taxpayer, his or her spouse and other dependents. Click herefor more information.
  • Social Security Benefits. Although Social Security benefits are generally not taxable, people with substantial income in addition to their Social Security may pay taxes on their benefits. If you file a federal tax return as an individual and your “combined income,” including one half of your Social Security benefits and nontaxable interest income is between $25,000 and $34,000, 50 percent of your Social Security benefits will be considered taxable. If your combined income is above $34,000, 85 percent of your Social Security benefits is subject to income tax. Click here for more information.
  • Home Sale Exclusion. Married couples can exclude from income up to $500,000 in profit on the sale of a home ($250,000 for single individuals). If a surviving spouse sells the home, he or she can still claim the exclusion as long as the house was sold no more than two years after the spouse’s death. Click here for more information.
  • Elderly or Disabled Tax Credit. Some low-income elderly or disabled individuals are entitled to a special tax credit. To be eligible, you must meet income limits. For more information, click here.
  • Tax Refunds. Getting a federal tax refund should not affect your Medicaid or Social Security benefits. For a year after recieving a tax refund from the federal government, the refund will not be considered income or resources for SSI or Medicaid purposes. You can also transfer the refund within a year without incurring a penalty. For more information, click here.
The IRS’s Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program offers free tax help to taxpayers who are 60 and older. For more information, click here. The IRS also publishes a Tax Guide For Seniors.

Additional Free Guides For Seniors>

Tips for Seniors in Preparing their Taxes

As April 15th is around the corner, the IRS has these tips for seniors preparing their taxes:

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Current research indicates that individuals are likely to make errors when preparing their tax returns. The following tax tips were developed to help you avoid some of the common errors dealing with the standard deduction for seniors, the taxable amount of Social Security benefits, and the Credit for the Elderly and Disabled. In addition, you’ll find links below to helpful publications as well as information on how to obtain free tax assistance.

Standard Deduction for Seniors – If you do not itemize your deductions, you can get a higher standard deduction amount if you and/or your spouse are 65 years old or older. You can get an even higher standard deduction amount if either you or your spouse is blind. (See Form 1040 and Form 1040A instructions.)

Taxable Amount of Social Security Benefits -When preparing your return, be especially careful when you calculate the taxable amount of your Social Security. Use the Social Security benefits worksheet found in the instructions for IRS Form 1040 and Form 1040A, and then double-check it before you fill out your tax return. See Publication 915Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits.


Credit for the Elderly or Disabled – You must file using Form 1040 or Form 1040A to receive the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled. You cannot get the Credit for the Elderly or Disabled if you file using Form 1040EZ. Be sure to apply for the Credit if you qualify; please read below for details.

Who Can Take the Credit: The Credit is based on your age, filing status and income. You may be able to take the Credit if:

Age: You and/or your spouse are either 65 years or older; or under age 65 years old and are permanently and totally disabled.

AND 

Filing Status: Your income on Form 1040 line 38 is less than $17,500, $20,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies), $25,000 (married filing jointly and both qualify), or $12,500 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year).

And, the non-taxable part of your Social Security or other nontaxable pensions, annuities or disability income is less than $5,000 (single, head of household, or qualifying widow/er with diependent child); $5,000 (married filing jointly and only one spouse qualifies); $7,500 (married filing jointly and both qualify); or $3,750 (married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse the entire year).

Calculating the Credit: Use Schedule R (Form 1040 or 1040A), Credit for the Elderly or Disabled, to figure the amount of the credit.  See the instructions for Schedule R (Forms 1040 or 1040A) if you want the IRS to figure this credit for you.

Also see Publications 524 (Credit for the Elderly or Disabled); and 554 (Tax Guide for Seniors). 

Free IRS Tax Return Preparation –  IRS-sponsored volunteer tax assistance programs offer free tax help to seniors and to low- to moderate-income people who cannot prepare their own tax returns.

If you have recently done some Estate Planning, check with us and your accountant to make sure you are filing your returns properly.

FREE ESTATE PLANNING GUIDE

Regards, Brian

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

States You Shouldn’t Be Caught Dead In:

Robert Negele is a 90-year-old retired executive who has lived in Connecticut for almost 40 years. Despite decades of community involvement, including service on corporate and charity boards, he and two of his children who live nearby are seriously considering leaving the state.

“It’s a prime possibility we discuss at Sunday night dinners,” Mr. Negele says.

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia, home to just over one-third of the U.S. population, levy an estate tax on the assets of people who die or an inheritance tax on heirs receiving assets. Jim Haynes

A big factor in their deliberations: Connecticut’s estate and gift taxes, which tax assets above $2 million per individual at rates as high as 12%. Mr. Negele says some snowbirds at his Stamford retirement home have shifted their tax home to Florida, while others he knows have left the state altogether.

Mr. Negele is far from alone, estate planners say. “State death taxes are considerably more important than they used to be, and we spend a lot of time planning for them,” says Beth Kaufman, an estate-tax lawyer at Caplin & Drysdale in Washington, in part because of changes in the federal tax laws.

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia, home to just over one-third of the U.S. population, levy an estate tax on the assets of people who die or an inheritance tax on heirs receiving assets. Maryland and New Jersey have both, although each allows offsets to prevent double taxation.

ImageIn January, Congress voted to keep Uncle Sam’s inflation-adjusted estate exemption above $5 million per individual ($10 million per married couple). The change excluded almost all Americans from the federal levy, so state-level taxes loom larger by contrast. (This year, the federal exemption is $5.25 million.)

Many states also have far smaller exemptions than Uncle Sam’s. The threshold is $1 million for estate taxes in Massachusetts, New York, Oregon and Minnesota, and just $675,000 in New Jersey. Pennsylvania’s and Iowa’s inheritance taxes have no exemption in some cases.

However, all states allow surviving spouses to inherit tax-free from their partners, says James Walschlager, an estate-tax specialist at CCH, a unit of Wolters Kluwer.

Only Delaware and Hawaii track the U.S.’s $5 million-plus exemption, according to Mr. Walschlager (see table on page B10).

Rates can be high as well. The top rate often is double digits, with Washington state’s the highest: 20%.

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Stay well,

Brian