Should My Parents Give Me Their Home?

Many people wonder if it is a good idea to give their home to their children. While it is possible to do this, giving away a house can have major tax consequences, among other results.

When you give anyone property valued at more than $14,000 (in 2016) in any one year, you have to file a gift tax form.  Also, under current law you can gift a total of $5.45 million (in 2016) over your lifetime without incurring a gift tax. If your parents’ residence is worth less than this amount, they likely won’t have to pay any gift taxes, but they will still have to file a gift tax form

While your parents may not have to pay taxes on the gift, if you sell the house right away, you may be facing steep taxes. The reason is that when property is given away, the tax basis (or the original cost) of the property for the giver becomes the tax basis for the recipient. For example, suppose your parents bought the house years ago for $150,000 and it is now worth $350,000. If they give their house to you, the tax basis will be $150,000. If you sell the house, you will have to pay capital gains taxes on $200,000 — the difference between $150,000 and the selling price. The only way for you to avoid the taxes is for you to live in the house for at least two years before selling it. In that case, you can exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 for a couple) of their capital gains from taxes.

Inherited property does not face the same taxes as gifted property. If you were to inherit the property, the property’s tax basis would be “stepped up,” which means the basis would be the current value of the property. However, the home will remain in your parents’ estate, which may have estate tax consequences.

Beyond the tax consequences, gifting a house to you can affect your parents’ eligibility for Medicaid coverage of long-term care.  There are other options for giving a house to children, including putting it in a trust or selling it to them. Before your parents give away their home, they should consult with your elder law attorney, who can advise them on the best method for passing on their home.

To read more articles about gifting from Brian A. Raphan, P.C. click here.

 

Careful…Gifting To Family Can Affect Medicaid Eligibility

By Matthew S. Raphan, Esq.  Attorney at The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

View image | gettyimages.com
View image | gettyimages.com

Every so often a client says to me, “I’ve been gifting money to my children and grandchildren so I can apply for Medicaid.” While gifting may offer benefits to you and your family, if you think you may someday apply for Medicaid benefits, you should be aware that giving away money or property can interfere with your eligibility.

Under federal law, if you transfer certain assets within five years prior to applying, you may be ineligible for Medicaid benefits for a period of time. This is called a transfer penalty, and the length of the penalty depends on the amount of money transferred. (This waiting period can also be costly as you may pay for your care out of your own pocket.) Even small transfers can affect eligibility. Although federal law currently allows individuals to gift up to $14,000 a year without having to pay a gift tax, Medicaid still treats that gift as a transfer.

Any transfer that you make, however nominal, may be scrutinized. For example, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. If you make a charitable donation, it could affect your Medicaid eligibility down the road. Similarly, gifts for holidays, weddings, birthdays, and graduations can all trigger a transfer penalty. If you buy something for a friend or relative, this could also result in a transfer penalty.

Some people have the notion that they can also go on a spending spree for themselves or family. Not so fast. Spending a large sum of cash at once or over time may prompt the state to request documentation showing how the money was spent. If you don’t have receipts showing that you received fair market value in return for a transferred asset, you could be subject to a transfer penalty.

While most transfers are penalized, certain transfers are exempt from this penalty. For example, even after entering a nursing home, you may transfer any asset to the following individuals without having to wait out a period of Medicaid ineligibility:

  • your spouse;
  • your child who is blind or permanently disabled;
  • a trust for the sole benefit of anyone under age 65 who is permanently disabled.

In addition, you may transfer your home to the following individuals (as well as to those listed above):

  • your child who is under age 21;
  • your child who has lived in your home for at least two years prior to your moving to a nursing home and who provided you with care that allowed you to stay at home during that time;
  • your sibling who already has an equity interest in the home and who lived there for at least one year before you moved to a nursing home.

Before transferring assets or property, check with us or your elder law attorney to ensure that it won’t affect your Medicaid eligibility.

For more information on Medicaid’s transfer rules, click here.

Related Articles:

Medicaid planning mistakes
TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES

If you have a question you can send us a message here.

Careful…Gifting To Family Can Affect Medicaid Eligibility

By Matthew S. Raphan, Esq.  Attorney at The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

View image | gettyimages.com
View image | gettyimages.com

Every so often a client says to me, “I’ve been gifting money to my children and grandchildren so I can apply for Medicaid.” While gifting may offer benefits to you and your family, if you think you may someday apply for Medicaid benefits, you should be aware that giving away money or property can interfere with your eligibility.

Under federal law, if you transfer certain assets within five years prior to applying, you may be ineligible for Medicaid benefits for a period of time. This is called a transfer penalty, and the length of the penalty depends on the amount of money transferred. (This waiting period can also be costly as you may pay for your care out of your own pocket.) Even small transfers can affect eligibility. Although federal law currently allows individuals to gift up to $14,000 a year without having to pay a gift tax, Medicaid still treats that gift as a transfer.

Any transfer that you make, however nominal, may be scrutinized. For example, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. If you make a charitable donation, it could affect your Medicaid eligibility down the road. Similarly, gifts for holidays, weddings, birthdays, and graduations can all trigger a transfer penalty. If you buy something for a friend or relative, this could also result in a transfer penalty.

Some people have the notion that they can also go on a spending spree for themselves or family. Not so fast. Spending a large sum of cash at once or over time may prompt the state to request documentation showing how the money was spent. If you don’t have receipts showing that you received fair market value in return for a transferred asset, you could be subject to a transfer penalty.

While most transfers are penalized, certain transfers are exempt from this penalty. For example, even after entering a nursing home, you may transfer any asset to the following individuals without having to wait out a period of Medicaid ineligibility:

  • your spouse;
  • your child who is blind or permanently disabled;
  • a trust for the sole benefit of anyone under age 65 who is permanently disabled.

In addition, you may transfer your home to the following individuals (as well as to those listed above):

  • your child who is under age 21;
  • your child who has lived in your home for at least two years prior to your moving to a nursing home and who provided you with care that allowed you to stay at home during that time;
  • your sibling who already has an equity interest in the home and who lived there for at least one year before you moved to a nursing home.

Before transferring assets or property, check with us or your elder law attorney to ensure that it won’t affect your Medicaid eligibility.

For more information on Medicaid’s transfer rules, click here.

Related Articles:

Medicaid planning mistakes
TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES

If you have a question you can send us a message here.

Can I Give My Kids $14,000 a Year?

If you have it to give, you certainly can, but there may be consequences should you apply for Medicaid long-term care coverage within five years after each gift.

medicaid planning

The $14,000 figure is the amount of the current gift tax exclusion (for 2014 and 2015), meaning that any person who gives away $14,000 or less to any one individual does not have to report the gift to the IRS, and you can give this amount to as many people as you like.  If you give away more than $14,000 to any one person (other than your spouse), you will have to file a gift tax return.  However, this does not necessarily mean you’ll pay a gift tax.  You’ll have to pay a tax only if your reportable gifts total more than $5.43 million (2015 figure) during your lifetime.

Many people believe that if they give away an amount equal to the current $14,000 annual gift tax exclusion, this gift will be exempted from Medicaid’s five-year look-back at transfers that could trigger a waiting period for benefits.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

The gift tax exclusion is an IRS rule, and this IRS rule has nothing to do with Medicaid’s asset transfer rules. While the $14,000 that you gave to your grandchild this year will be exempt from any gift tax, Medicaid will still count it as a transfer that could make you ineligible for nursing home benefits for a certain amount of time should you apply for them within the next five years.  You may be able to argue that the gift was not made to qualify you for Medicaid, but proving that is an uphill battle.

If you think there is a chance you will need Medicaid coverage of long-term care in the foreseeable future, see your elder law attorney before starting a gifting plan.

For more on Medicaid’s asset transfer rules, click here.

Regards,

Brian A. Raphan

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.  7 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001  212-268-8200 

http://www.RaphanLaw.com

WHY IRREVOCABLE TRUSTS VS OUTRIGHT GIFTING

People often wonder about the value of using irrevocable trusts in Medicaid planning. Certainly gifting of assets can be done outright, not involving an irrevocable trust. Outright gifts have the advantages of being simple to do with minimal costs involved.

Brian Raphan, P.C.

So, why complicate things with a trust? Why not just keep the planning as simple and inexpensive as possible?

The short answer is that gift transaction costs are only part of what needs to be considered. Many important benefits that can result from gifting in trust are forfeited by outright gifting. These benefits are what give value to using irrevocable trusts in Medicaid planning.

Key benefits of gifting in trust are:

  1. -Asset protection from future creditors of beneficiaries. Preservation of the exclusion of capital gain upon sale of the Settlors’ principal residence (the Settlor is the person making the trust).
  2. -Preservation of step-up of basis upon death of the trust Settlors o Ability to select whether the Settlors or the beneficiaries of the trust will be taxable as to trust income.
  3. -Ability to design who will receive the net distributable income generated in the trust.
  4. -Ability to make assets in the trust non-countable in regard to the beneficiaries’ eligibility for means-based governmental benefits, such as Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
  5. -Ability to specify certain terms and incentives for beneficiaries’ use of trust assets.
  6. -Ability to decide (through the settlors’ other estate planning documents) which beneficiaries will receive what share, if any, of remaining trust assets after the settlers die.
  7. -Ability to determine who will receive any trust assets after the deaths of the initial beneficiaries.
  8. -Possible avoidance of need to file a federal gift tax return due to asset transfer to the trust.

If you have questions about any of the above items, please call me, Brian A. Raphan, Esq at 212-268-8200 or 800-278-2960. There are additional measures available and your individual situation should be assessed before making any financial decision.

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