Why your Medicaid Application should be entrusted to an Elder Law Attorney:

The New York State Bar Association provides this informational pamphlet for long term care and Medicaid needs.

New York State Bar Association - Elder Law

What Is Medicaid?
Medicaid is the government funded program through which many persons receive care at home or in a nursing home. Medicaid is a state-wide and state specific program, currently admin- istered through each county’s Department of Social Services (with the exception of the five counties comprising metropolitan NewYork, which are administered through the single NYC entity, Human Resources Administration).
The process of applying for Medicaid is complex and often times confusing. Because Medicaid offers many different programs, the eligibility rules and application processes differ. Having an attor- ney who has a full and thorough understanding of the benefits available through Medicaid, the rules for eligibility, and the process by which to secure those benefits provides a tremendous advantage to the applicant for Medicaid benefits.
The Medicaid Application Process
Information Needed
Depending upon the program for which you are applying, different information may be required. All Medicaid applications, regardless of benefits sought, require extensive personal documenta- tion and detailed proof of income. Certain pro- grams require proof of assets and sixty months of records for all assets held during that period.
Help with the Application
An experienced Elder Law Attorney can advise you on the benefits available, the process for obtaining the benefits you need, the provisions of the law that might enable your family to protect assets, and the rights that certain family members of the applicant may have.
In New York State, it is not required that an attor- ney assist with the Medicaid appli- cation. In fact, you can prepare the appli- cation yourself. There are many entities, agencies, or divisions within hospitals and nursing homes which may offer to prepare and submit the application for you
for free or for a reduced fee. However, you must exercise great caution when accepting that help, as those entities and agencies are not obligated to advise you of your rights and are not permitted to give legal advice or implement legal strategies. Using these services might expose you and your family to risk.
Be Wary Of:
• Offers to prepare the Medicaid application free of charge or at a significantly reduced rate—
if it’s“too good to be true,”it probably is!
• Persons holding themselves out as attorneys or giving legal advice without confirming they are admitted to the New York State Bar.
• Guarantees of Medicaid eligibility or other government benefits.
• Agencies, entities or groups which have as their “sole job”the securing of Medicaid benefits for you. These entities may not have any liability to you if they fail to secure Medicaid eligibility.
Exposure to Risks When an Elder Law Attorney Is Not Used 

The law has many nuances and intricacies. An Elder Law Attorney has the obligation to ensure
that you are fully informed of all the provisions of law related to Medicaid, and to accurately answer any questions you may have. The Elder Law Attorney does not work for the nursing home. In fact, the Elder Law Attorney has an ethical duty to advocate for you and your interests.

Failing to use an Elder Law Attorney could expose you to the following risks:
• Failure to be fully informed of spousal rights;

• Failure to be informed of oppor-tunities for asset protection;
• Incomplete or inaccurate application submission;
• Denial of application due to failure to provide information;
• Failure to be informed of consequences of prior actions;
• Imposition of a penalty period for which mitigation strategies could have been implemented;

• Failure to have a dedicated advocate working with you through the process.

To learn read THE TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES click here.

Regards,

Brian

Appeals Court Upholds Class Certification of Nursing Home Residents Seeking Community-Based Alternatives

A U.S. Court of Appeals upholds a district court ruling that granted class certification to a group of disabled nursing home residents who complained of a lack of Medicaid-funded community-based alternatives.  In re District of Columbia, (D.C. Cir., No. 14-8001, June 26, 2015).
Embed from Getty Images

 

The plaintiffs, a group of disabled nursing home residents receiving Medicaid-funded long term care, sued the District of Columbia for allegedly violating its obligation, pursuant to the Americans with Disabilities Act, to provide services to the disabled in the most appropriate, integrated setting. The plaintiffs filed a motion seeking class certification, asserting that they were all similarly situated nursing home residents who wanted to live in the community but were forced to remain institutionalized against their will.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted the motion for class certification, finding that alleged systemic deficiencies, such as the District’s failure to offer sufficient discharge planning or to provide residents with meaningful choices of community-based alternatives to nursing home care, were sufficient bases upon which to certify the class.

The District filed a petition for permission to file an interlocutory appeal of the district court’s ruling certifying the class.  The District argued that the lower court committed manifest error by failing to identify policies or practices that were common to all members of the class and that were amenable to class-wide resolution.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit disagrees and upholds the class certification.  The court concludes that it was not manifest error for the lower court to find the allegations of systemic deficiencies in the program sufficient to establish a class of plaintiffs.

For the full text of this decision, click here.

ELDER ABUSE: FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION FOR $797,000

Another case handled by Brian A. Raphan, P.C. was on the Cover Page of the New York Law Journal last week.

I was appointed as Special Referee by the Supreme Court of the State of New York to perform a forensic review of Nassau County attorney Martha Brosius’ handling of a senior citizen’s financial affairs. Brian uncovered many undocumented and improper financial transactions and filed his detailed analysis to the Court.  As a result of my report, criminal actions were commenced against attorney Brosius, which ultimately led to a guilty plea. Brosius now faces 6-12 years behind bars.  Of course, she will lose her license to practice law.  Another win for the good guys!

The article is provided below.

*As appeared Front Page of the New York Law Journal 6/25/15,

By Andrew Denney, The New York Law Journal

ATTORNEY ADMITS TO TAKING $797,000 FROM CLIENTS

A Long Island elder law attorney has admitted to embezzling more than $797,000 from her clients over a four-year period, the Queens District Attorney’s Office announced on Tuesday.

elder abuse, district attorney

Martha Brosius, 52, of Brosius & Associates of Great Neck, appeared Tuesday before Acting Supreme Court Justice Helene Gugerty and pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree grand larceny and one count of scheme to defraud, according to a news release from Queens District Attorney Richard Brown’s Office.

“The defendant has admitted to breaching her fiduciary duty and unjustly enriching herself at the expense of her client,” Brown said in the release. Brosius was indicted for the offenses in 2013. Her clients included a 77-year-old man who had been deemed mentally incapable and for whom Brosius served as legal guardian, as well as two brothers who retained Brosius to sell their deceased father’s estate and establish a special-needs trust for their disabled sister, who was the sole heir to the father’s estate.

Brosius is scheduled to appear before Gugerty on Aug. 12 for sentencing. Gugerty has indicated that her prison sentence would range between four and 12 years. Brosius is a graduate of the St. John’s University School of Law and was admitted to the bar in 2003. According to the Office of Court Administration website, she has not been publicly disciplined. Her guilty plea will subject her to mandatory disbarment.

Assistant District Attorneys James Liander and Yvonne Francis appeared for the Queens District Attorney’s Office.

• • •

“Improper use of an adult’s funds, property, or resources by another individual is elder abuse. This includes, but is not limited to, fraud, embezzlement, forgery, falsifying records, coerced property transfers, or denial of access to assets.”  

TO REPORT FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION OF ELDERS IN NY STATE Click Here. Or Call 844-697-3505

FOR THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S PRESS RELEASE Click Here.

Careful…Gifting To Family Can Affect Medicaid Eligibility

By Matthew S. Raphan, Esq.  Attorney at The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

View image | gettyimages.com
View image | gettyimages.com

Every so often a client says to me, “I’ve been gifting money to my children and grandchildren so I can apply for Medicaid.” While gifting may offer benefits to you and your family, if you think you may someday apply for Medicaid benefits, you should be aware that giving away money or property can interfere with your eligibility.

Under federal law, if you transfer certain assets within five years prior to applying, you may be ineligible for Medicaid benefits for a period of time. This is called a transfer penalty, and the length of the penalty depends on the amount of money transferred. (This waiting period can also be costly as you may pay for your care out of your own pocket.) Even small transfers can affect eligibility. Although federal law currently allows individuals to gift up to $14,000 a year without having to pay a gift tax, Medicaid still treats that gift as a transfer.

Any transfer that you make, however nominal, may be scrutinized. For example, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. If you make a charitable donation, it could affect your Medicaid eligibility down the road. Similarly, gifts for holidays, weddings, birthdays, and graduations can all trigger a transfer penalty. If you buy something for a friend or relative, this could also result in a transfer penalty.

Some people have the notion that they can also go on a spending spree for themselves or family. Not so fast. Spending a large sum of cash at once or over time may prompt the state to request documentation showing how the money was spent. If you don’t have receipts showing that you received fair market value in return for a transferred asset, you could be subject to a transfer penalty.

While most transfers are penalized, certain transfers are exempt from this penalty. For example, even after entering a nursing home, you may transfer any asset to the following individuals without having to wait out a period of Medicaid ineligibility:

  • your spouse;
  • your child who is blind or permanently disabled;
  • a trust for the sole benefit of anyone under age 65 who is permanently disabled.

In addition, you may transfer your home to the following individuals (as well as to those listed above):

  • your child who is under age 21;
  • your child who has lived in your home for at least two years prior to your moving to a nursing home and who provided you with care that allowed you to stay at home during that time;
  • your sibling who already has an equity interest in the home and who lived there for at least one year before you moved to a nursing home.

Before transferring assets or property, check with us or your elder law attorney to ensure that it won’t affect your Medicaid eligibility.

For more information on Medicaid’s transfer rules, click here.

Related Articles:

Medicaid planning mistakes
TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES

If you have a question you can send us a message here.

Careful…Gifting To Family Can Affect Medicaid Eligibility

By Matthew S. Raphan, Esq.  Attorney at The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, PC

View image | gettyimages.com
View image | gettyimages.com

Every so often a client says to me, “I’ve been gifting money to my children and grandchildren so I can apply for Medicaid.” While gifting may offer benefits to you and your family, if you think you may someday apply for Medicaid benefits, you should be aware that giving away money or property can interfere with your eligibility.

Under federal law, if you transfer certain assets within five years prior to applying, you may be ineligible for Medicaid benefits for a period of time. This is called a transfer penalty, and the length of the penalty depends on the amount of money transferred. (This waiting period can also be costly as you may pay for your care out of your own pocket.) Even small transfers can affect eligibility. Although federal law currently allows individuals to gift up to $14,000 a year without having to pay a gift tax, Medicaid still treats that gift as a transfer.

Any transfer that you make, however nominal, may be scrutinized. For example, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. If you make a charitable donation, it could affect your Medicaid eligibility down the road. Similarly, gifts for holidays, weddings, birthdays, and graduations can all trigger a transfer penalty. If you buy something for a friend or relative, this could also result in a transfer penalty.

Some people have the notion that they can also go on a spending spree for themselves or family. Not so fast. Spending a large sum of cash at once or over time may prompt the state to request documentation showing how the money was spent. If you don’t have receipts showing that you received fair market value in return for a transferred asset, you could be subject to a transfer penalty.

While most transfers are penalized, certain transfers are exempt from this penalty. For example, even after entering a nursing home, you may transfer any asset to the following individuals without having to wait out a period of Medicaid ineligibility:

  • your spouse;
  • your child who is blind or permanently disabled;
  • a trust for the sole benefit of anyone under age 65 who is permanently disabled.

In addition, you may transfer your home to the following individuals (as well as to those listed above):

  • your child who is under age 21;
  • your child who has lived in your home for at least two years prior to your moving to a nursing home and who provided you with care that allowed you to stay at home during that time;
  • your sibling who already has an equity interest in the home and who lived there for at least one year before you moved to a nursing home.

Before transferring assets or property, check with us or your elder law attorney to ensure that it won’t affect your Medicaid eligibility.

For more information on Medicaid’s transfer rules, click here.

Related Articles:

Medicaid planning mistakes
TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES

If you have a question you can send us a message here.

JASA PETS Project: Helping NYC Seniors and Their Animal Companions

There is a little-known program in New York City that’s helping to keep some senior citizens’ pets where they belong — in their loving homes, and out of animal shelters. It’s the JASA PETS Project, and it’s making a difference for many NYC seniors and their pets.

JASA PETS Project: Helping NYC Seniors and Their Animal Companions.

JASA

Following a heart bypass operation, Ms. B. — a former teacher who lives alone with Lady, her two-year-old Dachshund — was feeling isolated, depressed, and useless. Already involved with the JASA Pets and Elder Team Support (PETS) Project, a group of international students was recruited to help Ms. B. care for her dog. In return, she has begun to work with them to improve their English conversational skills. The connection with the students has restored Ms. B. into a vibrant, involved educator interacting with a group of students who, in turn, are helping her dog.

Ms. H. suffers with multiple sclerosis. Isolated and bedridden, she relied upon her two cats for companionship. Sadly, last year one of her beloved cats died and shortly thereafter, her other cat, Foxy, wandered outside her apartment building and disappeared. Distraught over the loss, Ms. H. contacted JASA PETS. The Project Coordinator immediately posted flyers throughout the neighborhood and dispatched a team of volunteers to search for the missing cat. After two days, Foxy found her own way home, and was discovered scratching at her door. Ms. H. was thrilled that her companion was safely home, but also profoundly appreciative for the support she received from the PETS Project team throughout the ordeal.

These are just two of the many heart-warming successes that have been created by JASA PETS. JASA, the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged, is a social service agency dedicated to enhancing the lives of elderly New Yorkers. It is committed to creating innovative programs to meet the evolving and expanding needs of the aging. JASA created the PETS Project in 1997 to address the needs of elderly pet owners whose capacity to care for their pets has been compromised by frailty, illness, and/or inadequate income.

In recognition of the critical role that pets play in the lives of older people — particularly those who are homebound — the program is designed to keep seniors and their pet companions together. Studies show senior citizens with pets suffer less from depression, require fewer doctors’ visits, and have lower blood pressure than those without animal companions.

Often, increasing age and declining health create obstacles to providing proper care for pets. Seniors afflicted with arthritis lose the ability to walk their dogs or groom long-haired cats; fixed incomes often cannot be stretched to cover routine veterinary bills; and pet owners with complex health problems may refuse hospitalization because they have no one to care for their animals in their absence.

How JASA PETS Can Help

The JASA PETS Project matches volunteers with elderly pet owners to provide assistance tailored to the needs of each client. By matching a volunteer with an elderly client, the program provides for the care and well-being of both the senior and the pet.

The client-volunteer teams are overseen by a full-time coordinator, a social worker with prior work experience in pet care, who conducts an initial in-home assessment and is fully involved in the service plan, including reviews of pet care routines. Volunteers help with dog walking, litter box cleaning, emergency feeding, shopping for pet food and supplies, transportation to veterinarians and groomers, training, and pet sitting.

In some instances, a skilled volunteer is able to assist with administering medication to sick pets. In addition, the program provides foster care during client hospitalization periods and participates in pet placement after the death of the human companion. A small relief fund has been established to assist clients who cannot afford to pay for needed pet services and/or their own expenses. The availability of this fund helps relieve financially strapped seniors from the need to make financial choices that compromise their health or the health of their pets.

The program also provides seniors with information about low-cost pet care and will help them make arrangements for their pets in their will. And it can assist in finding a good adopter for a pet if a client dies or can no longer keep a pet.

For some clients, the program helps them through one of the most difficult situations imaginable — the loss of a pet. Such was the recent case of Ms. M., an isolated, homebound client who agonized for several weeks over the difficult decision to put her terminally ill companion cat, Samantha, to sleep. The JASA PETS team visited Ms. M. regularly, coordinated efforts with two veterinarians, assisted in the planning for burial services, and called her daily to provide support. When Samantha died naturally on May 23, the PETS team was there within 30 minutes to console Ms. M. An informal but meaningful memorial service was held at her apartment, and the JASA team took Samantha’s body to the burial provider that had been designated by Ms. M. The team continued to provide bereavement support to help their client through the mourning period.

JASA PETS is making a difference in the lives of many seniors and their pets. The program has been praised by other organizations that serve the senior population. Mary Dodd, Director of the Homebound Unit of the Carter Burden Center for the Aging, says, “On behalf of the Burden Center, I would like to extend my gratitude to the Project. The Project provides unique and vital services to the most vulnerable and forgotten segment of our society. It is imperative that the program be celebrated and receive the continuing support needed to sustain its existence.”

Wendy Golub, Director of Programs at The Caring Community, says, “The PETS Project provides a unique service to the seniors in our community. We at The Caring Community have enjoyed and profited from working with them as they are not only responsible and reliable, but collegial and a pleasure to work with.”

The program is available to senior citizens — regardless of race or religious affiliation — who are sixty years of age or older and are unable to fully provide for the care of their pet companions. Currently, JASA offers this program to residents of Manhattan only. However, it is the aim of PETS eventually to expand the program to include the five boroughs.

To contact JASA PETS for services, simply call (212) 273-5217 to schedule a meeting at the client’s home. Once the client has provided information about the pet and any pet care concerns, the client will be matched with a volunteer to assist them in addressing those concerns.

If you are interested in volunteering for the JASA PETS Project or making a contribution, please contact Paul Domin, Project Coordinator, at pdomin@jasa.org or call (212) 273-5217.

The JASA PETS Project is funded by the Tuttle, Leibovitz, and Ahimsa Foundations.

– See more at: http://www.animalalliancenyc.org/media/ootc/2006-09/aao.htm#sthash.ZCRvYkuD.4t8krsYb.dpuf

What Rights Do Bedsore Victims Have?

You’d be surprised how many times we hear the following from clients…”the nursing home said our dad’s skin condition was broken down and poor health led to bedsores”, or some similar version of this. These comments  inappropriately lead people to believe they or there loved ones do not have legal rights when it comes to bedsores or pressure sores (decubitus ulcers). Of course they are not the fault of the bedsore victim. Especially when they are in the care of professionals of a hospital, medical or nursing facility. Patients, elders, unhealthy or not do have legal rights–which also includes the right to sue for bedsores. Read more about the Rights of Bedsore Victims below:

bedsore treatment, bed sore malpractice

  1. The defendants insurance company may ask you for a recorded statement describing the appearance of bedsores and your treatment. Remember you have no obligation to give them such a statement, nor is it wise to do so.

  2. The defendant’s insurance company will ask you for authorizations to obtain your medical records. Let your attorney release your records after he or she has reviewed them. It’s best not to offer information by yourself. 

  3. Some insurance companies will offer you money to settle the case before you contact an attorney. In this situation the insurance company knows they will have to pay out money and they hope to settle the claim before you hire an attorney who can negotiate and demand a higher amount. Always consult an attorney if an insurance company is offering you money. By doing so you will in all likelihood increase your net recovery even after taking out the lawyers fee.

  4. Once a bedsore case is settled and the defendant is released, regardless of whether you make a full recovery or not, the money you received cannot be taken away, it is your money…tax free.

  5. If you need surgery, it is important to go forward with that before you settle your pressure sore or bedsore lawsuit.

  6. If you are persuaded by a hospital or nursing home and settle a case on your own, only to find out 6 months later you have more serious conditions than first thought, you have forfeited your rights to recover additional money. That is why it is so important to contact an experienced bedsore attorney before you sign anything.

  7. You are able to sue for and recover a monetary award from new injuries and infections and the aggravation of old ones caused by bedsores or pressure ulcers.

Additional Bedsore information & Guides:

THE DOCTOR WEIGHS IN BEDSORE ARTICLE by Attorney Brian A. Raphan

HOW MUCH IS A BEDSORE LAWSUIT WORTH: CASE EVALUATOR

DOWNLOAD: BEDSORE LEGAL & MEDICAL GUIDE

Grades of pressure sores
If a person is bedridden for long enough, the areas of skin constantly in contact with the mattress
or chair will start to discolor. This shows that the skin is in danger of ulcerating.
Pressure sores are graded to four levels, including:
• Grade I – skin discoloration, usually red, blue, purple or black
• Grade II – some skin loss or damage involving the top-most skin layers
• Grade III – necrosis (death) or damage to the skin patch, limited to the skin layers
• Grade IV – necrosis (death) or damage to the skin patch and underlying structures, such as tendon, joint or bone.

Complications of pressure sores
Untreated pressure sores can lead to a wide variety of secondary conditions, including: • Sepsis (bacteria entering the bloodstream)
• Cellulitis (inflammation of body tissue, causing swelling and redness)
• Bone and joint infections
• Abscess (a collection of pus).

For more helpful information  or a free consultation you may contact me by email here: Contact

Regards, Brian A. Raphan

Why You Should Redo Your Estate Plan When You Remarry:

Estate Planning, Raphan

If you are getting remarried, you obviously want to celebrate, but it is also important to focus on less exciting matters like redoing your estate plan. You may have created an estate plan during your first marriage, but this time it will probably be more complicated–especially if you have children from your first marriage or more assets. The following are some pointers for ensuring your interests are taken care of when you remarry:

  • Take an inventory. The first thing you and your partner should do is each take an inventory of your assets and debts and share it with the other person. Don’t forget to include life insurance policies and retirement plans in your inventories. It is important to be open and honest about money if you want to prevent bad feelings in the future.
  • Decide how you want to handle finances. Once you know what you are dealing with, then you need to decide if you want to combine (or not combine) assets when you are married. For example, if one partner is selling a house and moving in with the other partner, will he or she contribute to the cost of the house? If one partner has significant debt, you may not want to combine finances or make any joint purchases. These decisions need to be made upfront so everyone is clear on what to expect.
  • Decide what you want to happen when you die. You and your future spouse need to figure out where each of you wants your assets to go when you die. If you have children from a previous marriage, this can be a complicated discussion. There is no guarantee that if you leave your assets to your new spouse, he or she will provide for your children after you are gone. There are a number of options to ensure your children are provided for, including creating a trust for your children, making your children beneficiaries of life insurance policies, or giving your children joint ownership of property. Even if you don’t have children, there may be family heirlooms or mementos that you want to keep in your family. Again, open discussions can prevent problems in the future.
  • Consult an elder law or estate planning attorney. Even if you don’t have a lot of assets, you should consult an attorney, especially if you have children. You will definitely need to update your will. You may also need to update or create other estate planning documents such as a durable power of attorney and a health care proxy. If you have significant assets, a prenuptial agreement may be appropriate. In addition, the attorney can help you decide if a trust is necessary to protect your children’s interests.
  • Change your beneficiaries. You may want to change the beneficiaries on your life insurance policy, annuity, and/or retirement plan. If you are divorced, however, you may not be able to change some of the beneficiaries. Bring your divorce decree with you to the attorney so he or she can make sure you do not violate the decree. If you can’t change your beneficiaries, you may want to buy additional life insurance or retirement plans that will include your new spouse.
  • Consider a prenuptial agreement. While you are intending to stay married, things happen. Unlike a first marriage, you may be bringing property to this marriage that you spent decades accumulating and you may be merging two families. You need to decide together what your intentions are for the use of funds while you are living together, if you get divorced and when one of you dies before the other. Failure to think and plan ahead can mean severe heartache and financial costs for you and your family.
  • Consider purchasing long-term care insurance.The physical, emotional and financial cost of long-term care can deplete the savings of all but the most wealthy. While you may be willing to spend your lifetime of savings on the care of a spouse with whom you raised a family and accumulated the funds, you may not want to lose this to the care of a relatively new spouse. Long-term care insurance, while expensive, can permit you and your new spouse to get the care you need without impoverishing the other.

The most important thing to remember is to be open and honest with your future spouse and your family members about your wishes.

For more on estate planning, click here.

DOWNLOAD FREE ESTATE PLANNING GUIDE

Regards, Brian A. Raphan, Esq.

State Not Required to Treat Medicaid Applicant’s Multiple Transfers as One Transaction

A Kentucky appeals court rules that a Medicaid applicant’s penalty period is appropriate because the state is not required to treat multiple transfers as a single transaction when the transfers are not related. Marcum v. Commonwealth (Ky. Ct. App., No. 2014-CA-000487-MR, April 10, 2015).

In July 2011, Betty Marcum applied for Medicaid and the state imposed a penalty period based on a transfer of assets. During the penalty period, Ms. Marcum sold her home and transferred the proceeds into an irrevocable trust, with her family gifting a portion of the money back to her. She also made other transfers from her bank account. In June 2012, Ms. Marcum applied for Medicaid benefits again. The state imposed a second penalty period, running from the date of the second application.

Ms. Marcum appealed, contending that the state incorrectly calculated the penalty period. The state’s Medicaid operations manual requires that multiple related transfers be counted as a single transaction that occurred on the date of the first transfer and that once a penalty period has been established, it runs until expiration. Ms. Marcum argued that these provisions required the state to treat all of the disqualifying transfers together in a single penalty period. A state appeal board upheld the imposition of the second penalty period, and a trial court affirmed.

The Kentucky Court of Appeals affirms, holding that because Ms. Marcum’s second application involved transfers that were not related to the first penalty period, the state was not required to treat the transfers as a single transaction. The court rules that the state cannot “simply recalculate the first disqualification period to include transactions occurring after that period was imposed.” Similarly, the state cannot allow “the first disqualification period to be modified after it had expired.”

Remember, although federal funded, Medicaid rules do vary by state. For a free initial consultation or more information on how to protect and preserve your assets with Medicaid Planning, click here.

Free Tax Help & Filing for Low- and Middle-Income Taxpayers

The United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) is sponsoring the largest free tax counseling and preparation program in the country, available through AARP.

As seen in: SeniorLiving.about.com
As seen in: SeniorLiving.about.com

Who Can Use this Free Tax Help and Free Filing Service?

Most people who work need to file a tax return. AARP Tax-Aide is a free tax help service for people who meet the following criteria:

  • Low- or middle-income taxpayers who want tax help and free filing of their U.S. federal income tax returns
  • You must have a simple tax return. People seeking tax help who have more complex returns will be advised to get professional tax assistance.
  • You do not need to be a member of AARP or a senior to receive tax help from Tax-Aide, however special attention is paid to people age 60 and over.

What Are the Details of This Free Tax Help and Filing Service?
Every year, from February 1st through April 15th, about 32,000 trained and certified Tax-Aide volunteers across the country are available to provide tax help for preparing and filing your federal tax return.

  • Many Tax-Aide locations are equipped to file your return electronically, allowing you to receive your tax refund much faster.
  • Some Tax-Aide locations offer bilingual assistance.
  • In most situations, you must visit an AARP Tax-Aide site in person to have your tax returns prepared by Tax-Aide volunteers. However, special arrangements can be made to assist shut-ins and homebound disabled persons by providing tax help at locations including hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities, etc. To make a special tax help request, contact AARP at taxaide@aarp.org[/Email”>.
  • Volunteers are not available to provide tax help by phone, so visit the online tax counseling site for a list of frequently asked questions or to submit your own questions.
  • What Do I Need to Bring When I Receive Free Tax Help?
    • Photo identification
    • Social Security card
    • Wage and earning statements
    • Interest and dividend statements
    • A copy of last year’s federal and state returns if available
    • Your bank account and bank routing numbers so you can arrange for direct deposit of your tax refund
  • Where Can I Find the Closest Tax-Aide Site?

    What If There’s No Tax-Aide Site Near Me?
    If you cannot find a Tax-Aide location near you, the IRS offers other tax help options. For more information: