New: Visiting Lawyer Services for Elder New Yorkers

Visiting Lawyer Services

Why should the elderly that aren’t as mobile as they used to be, or live in an assisted living facility or are even at home wheelchair bound, not have easy access to the same professional legal care as others? Well, they should. And now they do.

Visiting Lawyer Services (VLS) is now available to New Yorkers that are homebound or unable to travel to a lawyer. With VLS our lawyers come to you. There’s no longer a need to coordinate aides, transfers or transportation as you won’t need it The same practice areas of elder law firm are the same available with VLS.  Most of the services that we handle in our office can be handled at your place. For example; signing of your Will, Living Will, Health Care Proxy, revising a Will, Estate Planning, Medicaid Planning or setting up a Trust. If witnesses are needed for signing documents we also arrange them to be with us as well. Other family members or loved ones may be present as well.

Visiting Lawyer Services

You remain in the comfort of your home, apartment or nursing facility and we’ll bring all the necessary documents. This has been very helpful for elder couples–as is often the case with elders, one spouse may be healthy and agile yet the other quite limited.

‘Not being burdened by travel time or hindered by physical ability also allows seniors to focus better on their legal needs. We’ve taken our hands-on approach, compassion and legal prowess to the next level’

For more information on how our Visiting Lawyer Services can help, feel free to call me at 212-268-8200. – Brian

http://www.VisitingLawyerServices.com

info@raphanlaw.com

The Rights of Nursing Home Residents

While residents of nursing homes have no fewer rights than anyone else, the combination of an institutional setting and the disability that put the person in the facility in the first place often results in a loss of dignity and the absence of proper care.

As a result, in 1987 Congress enacted the Nursing Home Reform Law that has since been incorporated into the Medicare and Medicaid regulations. In its broadest terms, it requires that every nursing home resident be given whatever services are necessary to function at the highest level possible. The law gives residents a number of specific rights:

  • Residents have the right to be free of unnecessary physical or chemical restraints. Vests, hand mitts, seat belts and other physical restraints, and antipsychotic drugs, sedatives, and other chemical restraints are impermissible, except when authorized by a physician, in writing, for a specified and limited period of time. 
  • To assist residents, facilities must inform them of the name, specialty, and means of contacting the physician responsible for the resident’s care. Residents have the right to participate in care planning meetings. 
  • When a resident experiences any deterioration in health, or when a physician wishes to change the resident’s treatment, the facility must inform the resident, and the resident’s physician, legal representative or interested family member. 
  • The resident has the right to gain access to all his or her records within one business day, and a right to copies of those records at a cost that is reasonable in that community. The facility must explain how to examine these records, or how to transfer the authority to obtain records to another person. 
  • The facility must provide a written description of legal rights, explaining state laws regarding living wills, durable powers of attorney for health care and other advance directives, along with the facility’s policy on carrying out these directives. 
  • At the time of admission and during the stay, nursing homes must fully inform residents of the services available in the facility, and of related charges. Nursing homes may charge for services and items in addition to the basic daily rate, but only if they already have disclosed which services and items will incur an additional charge, and how much that charge will be. 
  • The resident has a right to privacy, which is a right that extends to all aspects of care, including care for personal needs, visits with family and friends, and communication with others through telephone and mail. Residents thus must have areas for receiving private calls or visitors so that no one may intrude and to preserve the privacy of their roommates 
  • Residents have the right to share a room with a spouse, gather with other residents without staff present, and meet state and local nursing home ombudspersons or any other agency representatives. They may leave the nursing home, or belong to any church or social group. Within the home, residents have a right to manage their own financial affairs, free of any requirement that they deposit personal funds with the facility. 
  • Residents also can get up and go to bed when they choose, eat a variety of snacks outside of meal times, decide what to wear, choose activities, and decide how to spend their time. The nursing home must offer a choice at main meals, because individual tastes and needs vary. Residents, not staff, determine their hours of sleep and visits to the bathroom. Residents may self-administer medication. 
  • Residents may bring personal possessions to the nursing home such as clothing, furnishings and jewelry. Residents may expect staff to take responsibility for assisting in the protection of items or locating lost items, and should inquire about facility policies for replacing missing items. Residents should expect kind, courteous, and professional behavior from staff. Staff should treat residents like adults. 
  • Nursing home residents may not be moved to a different room, a different nursing home, a hospital, back home or anywhere else without advance notice, an opportunity for appeal and a showing that such a move is in the best interest of the resident or necessary for the health of other nursing home residents. 
  • The resident has a right to be free of interference, coercion, discrimination, and reprisal in exercising his or her rights. Being assertive and identifying problems usually brings good results, and nursing homes have a responsibility not only to assist residents in raising individual concerns, but also to respond promptly to those concerns.

Nursing Home Myths and Realities

Myth

Reality

Medicaid does not pay for the service you want.

Medicaid residents are entitled to the same service as other residents.

Only staff can determine the care you receive.

Residents and family have the right to participate in developing a care plan.

Staff cannot accommodate individual schedules.

A nursing home must make reasonable adjustments to honor residents’ needs and preferences.

You need to hire private help.

A nursing home must provide all necessary care.

Restraints are required to prevent the resident from wandering away.

Restraints cannot be used for the nursing home’s convenience or as a form of discipline.

Family visiting hours are restricted.

Family members can visit at any time of day or night.

Therapy must be discontinued because the resident is not progressing.

Therapy may be appropriate even if resident is not progressing; Medicare may pay even without current progress.

You must pay any amount set by the nursing home for extra charges.

A nursing home may only require extra charges authorized in the admission agreement.

The nursing home has no available space for residents or family members to meet.

A nursing home must provide a private space for resident or family councils.

The resident can be evicted because he or she is difficult or is refusing medical treatment.

Being difficult or refusing treatment does not justify eviction.

Understanding the Differences Between a Will and a Trust

Brian Raphan

Everyone has heard the terms “will” and “trust,” but not everyone knows the differences between the two. Both are useful estate planning devices that serve different purposes, and both can work together to create a complete estate plan.

One main difference between a will and a trust is that a will goes into effect only after you die, while a trust takes effect as soon as you create it. A will is a document that directs who will receive your property at your death and it appoints a legal representative to carry out your wishes. By contrast, a trust can be used to begin distributing property before death, at death or afterwards. A trust is a legal arrangement through which one person (or an institution, such as a bank or law firm), called a “trustee,” holds legal title to property for another person, called a “beneficiary.” A trust usually has two types of beneficiaries — one set that receives income from the trust during their lives and another set that receives whatever is left over after the first set of beneficiaries dies.

A will covers any property that is only in your name when you die. It does not cover property held in joint tenancy or in a trust. A trust, on the other hand, covers only property that has been transferred to the trust. In order for property to be included in a trust, it must be put in the name of the trust.

Another difference between a will and a trust is that a will passes through probate. That means a court oversees the administration of the will and ensures the will is valid and the property gets distributed the way the deceased wanted. A trust passes outside of probate, so a court does not need to oversee the process, which can save time and money. Unlike a will, which becomes part of the public record, a trust can remain private.

Wills and trusts each have their advantages and disadvantages. For example, a will allows you to name a guardian for children and to specify funeral arrangements, while a trust does not. On the other hand, a trust can be used to plan for disability or to provide savings on taxes. As your elder law attorney I can tell you how best to use a will and a trust in your estate plan. Feel free to email me with any questions.

Regards, Brian A. Raphan, Esq.

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.

7 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001

Free Download: 2014 Benefits Guide for Seniors: NYC

NYC Department of Aging, senior citizens, aarp
Free download. NYC Department of Aging resources. Free benefits guide for senior citizens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For 2014, this guide from NYY.gov  is a helpful resource for benefits available to senior citizens of New York.

Table of contents include:

Social Security 1

Supplemental Security Income 2

Veterans Benefits 3

New York Prescription Saver Card 3

Public Assistance 4

Medicare 5

Medicare Savings Program 6

Medicare Part D 7

Affordable Care Act 7

Medicaid 8

Food Stamps (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 9 Program SNAP)

Reduced Fare 10 Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) 11

Senior Citizen Homeowners Exemption (SCHE) 12

Real Property Tax Credit (IT-214) 13

Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) 14

Heating Equipment Repair or Replacement 15

Elderly Pharmaceutical Insurance Coverage (EPIC) 15

New York State School Tax Relief Program (STAR) 16 

Regards, Brian

info@raphanlaw.com

 

Some FAQ’s about Health Care Proxys

As an Elder Law attorney  for over 25 years  I have recently been getting more and more questions about Health Care Proxys. Below are some answers as well as a link to a Free Sample Draft so my readers can see what it’s all about:

 Why you need a will
Living Will
 

What is a Health Care Proxy?

A Health Care Proxy is someone you appoint to make health related decisions for you, in the event you can not.

Who decides that I’m not able to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your attending physician will decide whether you lack the capacity to make health care decisions. The decision is made in writing. A second doctor also must be consulted in the case of decisions to withdraw or withhold life-sustaining treatment.  You will be given notice of these decisions if there is any indication that you can understand it. If you object to this decision or to a decision made by your agent, your objection or decision will prevail unless a court determines that you are unable to make health care decisions.

 

What if I recover the ability to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your doctor is required to decide whether you can make your own health care decisions and confirm it in writing each time your doctor plans on acting on your agent’s health care decisions. If you have recovered the ability to make your own decisions, your agent will not be able to make any more decision for your unless you again lose the abilities to make them. 

 

How do I complete a Healthcare Proxy?

In New York State, laws set forth the requirements for completing a health care proxy. You must be at least 18 years old and have the capacity to make your own decisions at the time you complete the proxy.

You must state your name and the name of the person you want to act as your agent, and state that your want the agent to have the authority to make health care decisions for you. You also must sign and date your health care proxy in the presence of two adult witnesses who are not names as your agent and have the witnesses sign the proxy. Please note that there are also special rules for the execution of a proxy by residents of psychiatric facilities.

Please note that you do not need to have a lawyer draft your health care proxy, however, you may wish to consult with a lawyer for advice about a health care proxy.

 

When will my Healthcare Proxy end?

You can create a proxy that lasts for a limited period of time by including in the document the dates you want the proxy to be valid. You can also revoke your proxy if you wish and you are competent to do so.

If you have appointed your husband or wife as your agent, and then you divorce or legally separate, the appointment will be revoked unless you specify that you do not wish to revoke it. You should review your proxy periodically to be sure that it continues to reflect your wishes. 

 

 Where should I keep my Proxy?

It’s best to give a copy of your proxy to your doctor as well as to the agent named in your proxy. If you revoke your proxy, be sure to notify whomever you gave a copy of the proxy. Upon entering a hospital you may give it to an administrator in charge, as your doctor, or attending physician may not be there when you arrive. Also, keep a copy with your other important documents such as a Power of Attorney and Will. All should be reviewed every couple of years.

What if I don’t want a Healthcare Proxy?

You can’t be required to execute a health care proxy as a condition of receiving health care services or insurance. Also, the lack of a health care proxy or other specific instructions does not crate any presumptions regarding your wishes about health care.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me! You can also visit this page on our website and download a FREE SAMPLE DRAFT of a health care proxy.

Regards, Brian

info@RaphanLaw.com

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.

7 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001

Court Ruling: Transfers Made Years Before Needing Care Were Not Made in Order to Qualify for Medicaid

Doing Medicaid Planning for clients, I often get asked the question: “How does medicaid determine if my gifts were made to qualify for medicaid or not?” Saavy clients have a long history of gifting to show a pattern meant for gifting not medicaid spend down. This recent decision should be of interest.

medicaid planning, appeal
http://www.raphanlaw.com

A New York appeals court holds that a Medicaid applicant who transferred funds several years before needing long-term care and kept enough resources to care for herself rebutted the presumption that the transfers were made in order to qualify for Medicaid. Safran v. Shah (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div., 2nd. Dept., 2013-04373, 20166/12, July 2, 2014).

While she was living independently and didn’t require long-term care, Louise Kornhaber transferred funds to her family as gifts. Several years later, Ms. Kornhaber entered a nursing home. Due to the unexpected theft of her remaining resources, Ms. Kornhaber applied for Medicaid. The state assessed a penalty period based on the uncompensated transfers.

Ms. Kornhaber appealed, arguing that the transfers were made for a reason other than to qualify for Medicaid. The state affirmed the penalty period, and Ms. Kornhaber appealed to court.

The New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, orders the state to provide Ms. Kornhaber with Medicaid benefits, holding that the penalty period was not appropriate. The court rules that because Ms. Kornhaber still had enough resources to maintain herself for years after she made the transfers, she rebutted the presumption that the transfer was made in order to qualify for Medicaid.

Medicaid Planning takes the experience and legal expertise of a qualified attorney. The detailed process of medicaid planning needs to avoid errors and mistakes that can make you ineligible of cost you possibly tens of thousands of dollars in delays or penalties. Click here to read: 8  Medicaid Mistakes to Avoid,

For the full text of this decision, go to: https://www.nycourts.gov/reporter/3dseries/2014/2014_04943.htm

Any questions? Send me an email: info@raphanlaw.com or call 212-268-8200 during the day for a free consultation.

Regards, Brian

Can You Appeal If Medicare Refuses to Cover Care You Received?

Absolutely.  Sometimes Medicare will decide that a particular treatment or service is not covered and will deny a beneficiary’s claim. Many of these decisions are highly subjective and involve determining, for example, what is “medically and reasonably necessary” or what constitutes “custodial care.” If a beneficiary disagrees with a decision, there are reconsideration and appeals procedures within the Medicare program.

medicare denialWhile the federal government makes the rules about Medicare, the day-to-day administration and operation of the Medicare program are handled by private insurance companies that have contracted with the government. In the case of Medicare Part A, these insurers are called “intermediaries,” and in the case of Medicare Part B they are referred to as “carriers.” In addition, the government contracts with committees of physicians — quality improvement organizations (QIOs) — to decide the appropriateness of care received by most Medicare beneficiaries who are inpatients in hospitals.

If an intermediary, carrier or QIO decides Medicare shouldn’t pay for care you received, you will learn this when you receive your Medicare Summary Notice (MSN). The Medicare Rights Center recommends first making sure that the coverage denial isn’t simply the result of a coding mistake.  You can ask your doctor to confirm that the correct medical code as used.  If the denial is not the result of a coding error, you can appeal the denial using Medicare’s review process. Click here for details on this process.

Once Medicare’s review process has been exhausted, the matter can be taken to court if the amount of money in dispute exceeds either $1,000 or $2,000, depending on the type of claim. Medicare beneficiaries can represent themselves during these appeal proceedings, or they can be represented by a personal representative or an attorney. The Medicare Rights Center estimates that only about 2 percent of Medicare beneficiaries appeal denials of care, but 80 percent of those who appeal Part A denials and 92 percent who appeal Part B denials win more care.

 

Even if Medicare ultimately rejects a disputed claim, a beneficiary may not necessarily have to pay for the care he or she received. If a recipient did not know or could not have been expected to know that Medicare coverage would be denied for certain services, the recipient is granted a “waiver of liability” and the health care provider is the one who suffers the economic loss. In cases where this limited waiver of liability does not apply, however, the beneficiary is liable for any costs of care that Medicare does not cover. For example, a patient is financially responsible for any services normally provided under Medicare Part B if provided by a nonparticipating provider who did not “accept assignment” of the claim.

For more information email me at info@RaphanLaw.com or visit http://RaphanLaw.com. Or stay on top of these issues by subscribing to my free email Newsletters. Sample here… 

Regards, Brian

The New New York Estate Tax Beware A 164% Marginal Rate

Some timely tax news from Forbes staff writer Ashlea Ebeling:

It’s no April Fool’s joke. New York state doubled its estate tax exemption as of today. And it’s set to rise gradually through 2019—if you hang on that long–to eventually match the generous federal exemption, projected to be $5.9 million by then. That will sure make planning much easier for a lot of folks, but there are still big traps in the new law to watch out for.

One trap in New York is a new “cliff,” so called because if it’s triggered you basically fall into a state estate tax abyss.

As of April 1, 2014, the exemption amount is $2,062,500.  That shields way more people from the state levy. But if you die with just 5% more than $2,062,500, you face a cliff. That means you’re taxed on the full value of your estate, not just the amount over the exemption amount.

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Here’s an example of how the new law could translate into a marginal New York estate tax rate of nearly 164%, courtesy of the New York State Society of CPAs in this comment letter on the proposed law. By the time the exemption is $5.25 million in 2017 and 2018, a decedent with a New York taxable estate of $5,512,500 (that’s 5% more than the exemption), would pay New York estate tax of $430,050. In effect, there is a New York estate tax of $430,050 on the extra $262,500. “We do not believe that this cliff is consistent with the Governor’s objectives of making New York a more favorable environment for New Yorkers during their golden years,” the letter says. Oh well.

Here’s the rundown of the new exemption schedule:

For deaths as of April 1, 2014 and before April 1, 2015, the exemption is $2,062,500.

For deaths as of April 1, 2015 and before April 1, 2016, the exemption is $3,125,000.

For deaths as of April 1, 2016 and before April 1, 2017, the exemption is $4,187,500.

For deaths as of April 1, 2017 and before January 1, 2019, the exemption is $5,250,000.

As of January 1, 2019 and after, the exemption amount will be linked to the federal amount, which the IRS sets each year based on inflation adjustments—it’s projected to be $5.9 million in 2019. The top rate remains at 16%. (The original budget and the Senate bill had proposed a top rate of 10%.)

In addition to the cliff, there are other problems with the new law. For one, there is no portability provision like in the federal law—that allows a surviving spouse to shelter twice as much without the use of complicated trusts–notes Sharon Klein, managing director of Family Office Services & Wealth Strategies with Wilmington Trust.

There’s a three-year look-back for taxable gifts (those gifts are pulled back into your estate) for gifts made on or after April 1 and before Jan. 1, 2019, but not including any gift made when the decedent wasn’t a New York state resident.

There are basis questions, depreciation questions, and different treatments of estate planning transactions under federal and New York income tax laws, says Donald Hamburg, an estate lawyer with Golenbock Eiseman Assor Bell & Peskoe in New York City. “What’s troubling is that there are so many open questions. It’s a highly complex set of rules,”  he says.

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Regards, Brian

http://www.RaphanLaw.com

 

Why Not Just Use an Off-the-Shelf Power of Attorney Form?

poaA durable power of attorney is one of the most important estate planning documents you can have. It allows you to appoint someone to act for you (your “agent” or “attorney-in-fact”) if you become incapacitated. Without a POA, your loved ones would not be able to make decisions for you or manage your finances without asking the court to appoint a guardian or conservator, which is an expensive and time-consuming process.

There are many do-it-yourself power of attorney forms available; however, it is a good idea to have an attorney draft the form for you. There are many issues to consider and one size does not fit all.

The agent’s powers

The power of attorney document sets out the agent’s powers. Powers given to an agent typically include buying or selling property, managing a business, paying debts, investing money, engaging in legal proceedings, borrowing money, cashing checks, and collecting debts. They may also include the power to consent to medical treatment. Some powers will not be included unless they are specifically mentioned. This includes the power to make gifts and the power to designate beneficiaries of your insurance policies.

The power to make gifts of your money and property is a particularly important power. If you want to ensure your agent has the authority to do Medicaid planning on your behalf in the event you need to enter a nursing home, then the power of attorney must give the agent the power to modify trusts and make gifts. The wording in a power of attorney can be significant, so it is necessary to consult an attorney.

Springing or immediate

The power of attorney can take affect immediately or it can become effective only once you are disabled, called a “springing” power of attorney. While a springing power seems like a good idea, it can cause delays and extra expense because incapacity will need to be determined. If the power of attorney is springing, it is very important that the method for determining incapacity is clearly spelled out in the document.

Joint agents

While it is possible to name more than one person as your agent, this can lead to confusion. If you do have more than one person named, you need to be clear whether both parties need to act together or whether they can each act independently. It might make more sense and be less confusing to name an alternative agent to act in case the first agent is unable to.

Appointing a guardian

Another use of a power of attorney can be to nominate a guardian in case guardianship proceedings become necessary. Including your preference for a guardian can allow you to have some say over who will be managing your affairs. Usually, the court decides who will be chosen as a guardian, but in most circumstances, the court will abide by your nomination in the durable power of attorney.

Executing the power of attorney

To be valid a power of attorney must be executed properly. Some states may require a signature, others may require the power of attorney to be notarized, and still others may require witnesses. It is important to consult with an estate planning attorney in your state to ensure your power of attorney is executed properly.

Accepting a power of attorney

Even if you do everything exactly right, some banks and other institutions are reluctant to accept a power of attorney. These institutions are afraid of a lawsuit if the power of attorney is no longer valid. Many banks or other financial institutions have their own standard power of attorney forms. To avoid problems, you may want to execute the forms offered by the institutions with which you have accounts. According to a MarketWatch.com article, you need to be careful that you don’t sign a bank’s document that inadvertently restricts a power of attorney’s ability to deal with other assets, and you should check that any documents you sign with a bank match the original power of attorney.

For more information on the subject, visit this section on our website.

Regards, Brian A. Raphan, PC

The 10 Most Overlooked Tax Deductions for Care Givers

Thanks to AgingCare.com &  for contributing these often forgotten tips:

Before filing your taxes, don’t miss out on deductions related to medical expenses and other costs that come out of your wallet as you care for a family member throughout the year.

An estimated one-third of U.S. taxpayers, or about 45 million people, itemize their taxes instead of taking IRS’ standard deduction. An estimated $1.26 trillion worth of deductions are claimed annually, according to experts with TurboTax.

See if you can get a break on your taxes, with these 10 tax deductions.

1. Medical expenses

Nearly 100 medical costs can be deducted, related to the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of disease or costs for treating any part of the body. Those include equipment, services and supplies, ranging from glasses to eye surgery to acupuncture to prescriptions.

“Lots of adults are paying for prescriptions for their elderly parents,” says Melissa Labant, a CPA and technical manager for the American Institute of CPAs.

Even artificial limbs, bandages, hearing aids and wigs are accepted medical expenses (for others, see IRS’ Publication 502). The medical and dental costs must total more than 7.5 percent of your adjusted gross income to be deducted.

2. Long-term health care costs

An often-missed expense is the amount paid for long-term care services and long-term care insurance (that’s a more limited deduction, depending on age). Rehabilitation, therapeutic, preventative and personal care services are among those that qualify as long-term care services, if your family member is chronically ill and if it’s part of a plan set by a health care practitioner.

Someone is considered chronically ill if they can’t perform at least two activities of daily living (such as eating, toileting, bathing and dressing) without substantial assistance from someone else.

3. Mileage

From weekly doctor’s appointments to out-of-town visits with a specialist or for a procedure, the miles you log for your parents’ medical needs can be deducted.

“You can take that if they qualify as your dependent. Keep a log as you’re running around,” says Mary Beth Saylor, a CPA and tax principal with Windham Brannon, an Atlanta-based accounting firm. “I’ve hardly seen anybody really keep up with that.” You can take approximately 19 cents a mile for 2012, for medical mileage.If you’re staying overnight for a medical purpose, deduct $50 per night, for each person, for lodging.

4. Dental expenses

Go ahead and smile – dental expenses are among the costs that some people ignore, including dentures and artificial teeth.

5. Home improvements for aging adults

Investing in ramps for a wheelchair-bound parent, handrails and grab bars in the bathroom or a stepless shower can be part of a deduction. It doesn’t matter if the improvements are in your home or your parents’ home, as long as it doesn’t add value to the house, Saylor says.

The IRS says that the cost of the improvement is reduced by the increase in your property value. Other changes, such as widening doorways and hallways, lowering kitchen cabinets and installing lifts, also typically do not add value to houses.

6. Energy-saving home improvements

Whether or not you did this in the course of being a caregiver, any energy-saving changes are eligible for a credit. For more traditional items such as insulation and windows, it’s 10 percent of the cost (a maximum of $500). For alternative energy equipment, like a solar hot water heater, the credit is up to 30 percent of the cost. Find more details from the federal EnergyStar program.(www.energystar.gov)

7. Mortgage interest

If you are paying interest on your or your parents’ home loans, construction loans or home equity lines of credit, it’s deductible. There are some limitations, though, so you need to discuss with your accountant.

8. State and local sales tax

This is an excellent idea if you live in a state that doesn’t have income tax. If you do, you’ll need to make a choice: Deduct state and local sales taxes, or state and local income taxes. You may find that the best financial benefit, in that case, is to stick with the income tax deduction, according to experts with TurboTax. Take some time to figure out your best option by using the IRS sales tax calculator.

9. Estate tax on an inherited IRA

This is not as easy as deducting medical expenses or charitable contributions, but is worth checking out. If you inherited an IRA from your parents, you could take an deduction for the federal estate tax paid on IRA income.

10. Charitable contributions

Of course, you may know to estimate the value of items you or your parents donate to charity. But you also can include other out-of-pocket costs related to volunteering. If you or your parents bought ingredients to make meals for the homeless or elderly, or if you drove a personal vehicle while volunteering or assisting a charity, those and other costs can be deducted.

Tax planning as well as considering other estate planning methods can help you save money. Visit our website. We offer free initial consultation to seniors.

Regards,

Brian A. Raphan

http://www.RaphanLaw.com