Can you sue for Bedsores or Pressure Sores?

bedsore lawyer

2019 Law Firm added Free Booklet

Bedsores should not happen while in a nursing home or hospital. Often they are due to neglect and negligence.

Bedsores, Pressure Sores or Decubitis Ulcers are not the fault of the patient. At a hospital or nursing home there are federal laws in place to protect patients and assure they get the proper care. When these standards of care are not used sores can develop. Simple duties like turning an immobile patent frequently to relieve pressure, proper cleaning an hygiene are sometimes not provided. If a sore develops the patient has now become a victim. The sores can cause extreme pain and suffering and unfortunately even death. You can sue. And you have every right to do so and get financial compensation. Depending on the case, monetary awards can be in the millions. Below are some of the different types of lawsuits relating to sores.

Medical Malpractice

Medical Malpractice cases arise when a health care practitioner departs from the accepted standard of care in the medical community. In more simple terms, when a hospital, doctor, nurse, practitioner commits a serious error in his/her care and treatment, which results in further injury to the patient. Some common examples are failing to diagnose the bedsore; failing to report bedsores or pressure sores; failing to admit a patient into the hospital for bedsores when necessary; and failing to perform a medical procedure or provide treatment for bedsores that was otherwise indicated.

FREE BEDSORE FACTS BOOKLET>

angle booklet2

Nursing Home Liability

The elderly population frequently suffers due to serious neglect once they become patients or residents in nursing homes or any long term care facility.  Some critical issues relating to sores are: over or improper medication; lack of supervision; inadequate wound care leading to infections; not reporting the issue in a timely manner and overall neglect.

The severe injuries that patients experience along with the constant pain and suffering associated with bedsores are often the result of preventable situations. In our experience in handling these types of cases we have found frequent examples of poor care planning; lack of stimulation; failures to turn and position patients; failure to provided adequate pressure relief devices to patients; and unbelievably, failure to change adult diapers and failure to provide sufficient quantities of food and water. As a result of neglect in Nursing Homes, the illnesses range from severe infections and amputations, to dehydration and, unfortunately, death. Bedsores and pressure sores often lead to further infections and illnesses.

Hospital Negligence

At one time or another we all go to hospitals. While patients there, we have the right to expect quality medical care and treatment.  The unfortunate reality is that there are often tragic outcomes that are the result of medical malpractice which should never occur. This is especially true with bedsores.

Hospital Negligence occurs when there are “departures in the standards of good and accepted medical practices” that one should be able to expect in the local medical community given the current state of medical treatment and technology. These departures in the standard of care can stem from negligent treatment on the part of Doctors, Surgeons, Specialists, Lab Technicians, Physician Assistants, Nurses, Nurses Aides, Therapists, Administrators, Pharmacists and any other member of the Hospital Staff whose conduct, actions, or inaction, causes injuries and suffering that should not have occurred.

Some examples of Hospital Negligence include failure to provide proper medication or medical devices; failure to provide proper monitoring and supervision; failure to order consultations to other medical specialists; failure to diagnose bedsores in a timely fashion; failure to prevent infection and amputation; failure to turn and position the patient resulting in pressure sores, bedsores or decubitus ulcers; failure to perform a medical procedure or surgery properly; failure to warn patient of risks of a surgery or medical procedure; failure to keep family members informed regarding medical decision making; and failure to provide safe and proper discharge instructions.

Wrongful Death

This type of lawsuit occurs when a spouse or close relative has a right to recover when a loved one dies due to the sores or a medical complication that was related to the sores. Recovery is from the at-fault or negligent party. Recovery can include loss of income, services, comfort and society. New York has a very restrictive and complicated wrongful death statute. Our knowledgeable lawyers take you through it one step at a time. We understand that dealing with the loss of a loved one is not easy, so we are extremely sensitive when dealing with family members. Unfortunately, left untreated or not treated in time, bedsores can rapidly progress from stage 1-4 and lead to further complications often resulting in a wrongful death.

If you or someone you know is a victim of bedsores, the first thing to do is get the stage of the sore identified and immediate and proper medical attention. If you think you have a lawsuit then contact me on how to proceed. You can also begin an evaluation online by clicking here. We can even help you get better medical attention at the same time. Feel free to email about these matters at bedsores@RaphanLaw.com

Regards, Brian

What are the facts about your rights as a victim of bedsores?

Screen Shot 2019-03-27 at 9.57.49 AM.png

Often from the onset of bedsores, also described as pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, victims in a hospital or nursing home are led to believe it is their fault. They may be led to believe they don’t have a right to sue and that there is no chance for compensation. It’s simply not true.

Below are some facts about lawsuits and your rights as a patient and victim.

  1. You are able to sue for and recover a monetary award from new injuries and infections and the aggravation of old ones caused by bedsores or pressure ulcers.

  2. The defendants insurance company may ask you for a recorded statement describing the appearance of bedsores and your treatment. Remember you have no obligation to give them such a statement, nor is it wise to do so.

  3. The defendant’s insurance company will ask you for authorizations to obtain your medical records. DON’T DO IT. Let your attorney release your records after he or she has reviewed them. It’s best not to offer information by yourself. 

  4. Some insurance companies will offer you money to settle the case before you contact an attorney. In this situation the insurance company knows they will have to pay out money and they hope to settle the claim before you hire an attorney who can negotiate and demand a higher amount. Always consult an attorney if an insurance company is offering you money. By doing so you will in all likelihood increase your net recovery even after taking out the lawyers fee.

  5. Once a bedsore case is settled and the defendant is released, regardless of whether you make a full recovery or not, the money you received cannot be taken away, it is your money…tax free.

  6. Continue to full article>

Use our Free Bedsore Lawsuit Evaluator> or feel free to contact me for more information.

Brian A. Raphan, PC  email: bedsores@RaphanLaw.com

How To Spot Nursing Home Neglect Or Abuse?

justice engraved on courthouse

Nursing home neglect and abuse is often difficult to detect, and families should be on the lookout for common warning signs for physical, emotional and financial abuse.

Common warning signs of physical abuse are:

  • Untreated bedsores, pressure sores, wounds, cuts, bruises, or welts
  • Abnormally pale complexion
  • Bruises in a pattern that would suggest restraints
  • Excessive and sudden weight loss
  • Fleas, lice, or dirt on or in the room
  • Poor personal hygiene, unpleasant odors or other unattended health problems
  • Torn clothing or broken personal items
  • Bleeding around private parts
  • Bloody undergarments
  • Bruises around the breast/genital region
  • An unexpected look of fear from the elder when aide may be present

Common warning signs of emotional abuse are:

  • Intimidation through yelling and threats
  • Humiliation
  • Ignoring the patient
  • Isolating the patient from other residents and/or activities
  • Terrorizing the patient
  • Mocking the patient

Financial exploitation is another form of abuse. An unscrupulous caregiver may:

  • Misuse checks, accounts, or credit cards
  • Steal money, steal checks, or steal belongings
  • Forge signatures
  • Authorize withdrawals or transfer of monies
  • Steal the patient’s identity

No family is exempt from any of these possibilities. Abuse affects the rich and poor. Suffering sustained by the elderly ranges from financial, to emotional and physical. Abuse escalating to physical can result in severe infections, amputations, dehydration and, unfortunately, death. A lawsuit should be filed on behalf of your loved one to get the justice your family deserves. Compensation may cover the costs of treatment and recovery, as well as compensation for non-financial hardships such as pain and suffering.

If you suspect elder abuse of any kind speak up and demand answers of those in charge.

Feel free to contact me for more information or inquire about a lawsuit.

Sincerely,

Brian

Secret data: Most VA nursing homes have more residents with bed sores, pain, than private facilities

Via Donovan Slack, USA TODAY, and Andrea Estes, The Boston Globe

Don Ruch’s family thought round-the-clock care would help him recuperate, but he ended up in intensive care in septic shock, suffering from “severe” malnutrition, bedsores on his pelvis and back, a burn on his right thigh and a trauma wound. USA TODAY

Screen Shot 2018-06-25 at 2.59.17 PM
Click for video:

An analysis of internal documents shows residents at more than two-thirds of Department of Veterans Affairs nursing homes last year were more likely to have serious bedsores, as well as suffer serious pain, than their counterparts in private nursing homes across the country.

The analysis suggests large numbers of veterans suffered potential neglect or medication mismanagement and provides a fuller picture of the state of care in the 133 VA nursing homes that serve 46,000 sick and infirm military veterans each year.

More than 100 VA nursing homes scored worse than private nursing homes on a majority of key quality indicators, which include rates of infection and decline in daily living skills, according to the analysis of data withheld by the VA from public view but obtained by USA TODAY and The Boston Globe.

The news organizations reported last week that 60 VA nursing homes received the agency’s lowest quality ranking of one out of five stars last year, but the data didn’t detail how individual facilities scored on specific measures. USA TODAY and The Globe are now publishing the full data, outlined in internal documents, for every VA nursing facility as of Dec. 31, 2017.

Four VA facilities – nursing homes in Bedford, Massachusetts; Chillicothe, Ohio; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Roseburg, Oregon – lagged private nursing home averages on 10 of 11 indicators. At all four, about a third of residents were given anti-psychotic drugs – almost twice as much as in the private sector. The FDA has said such drugs are associated with an increased risk of death in elderly patients with dementia.

“They should be assessing individuals and doing what they can to manage it,” said Robyn Grant, director of public policy and advocacy at the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care. “And if it’s not working, they should be trying different things.”

The VA, which has argued that its residents are typically sicker than those in private facilities, has tracked the detailed quality data for more than two years but has kept it secret, depriving veterans of potentially crucial health care information.

VA ‘evaluating’ what information to release

VA Press Secretary Curt Cashour has declined to answer questions about whether or when the agency planned to release the quality information, as well as nursing home staff data the VA has compiled dating to 2004. He also declined to say when the VA would release inspection reports the agency has kept secret for more than a decade.

After the investigative report by USA TODAY and The Globe last week, Louisiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy and Alabama Democratic Sen. Doug Jones introduced legislation that would force the VA to release all of its nursing home quality information at least once a year.

“We cannot work with this administration or any administration to fix the VA if we don’t have the information,’’ Jones said.

Acting VA Secretary Peter O’Rourke told the CBS affiliate in Dallas last week that VA officials were “evaluating exactly what is the most appropriate for us to put out there and that will support continuous improvement and then also will provide good decision-making information for veterans.”

He called the USA TODAY and Globe reporting on the VA nursing home ratings “fake news.”

Federal regulations require private nursing homes to disclose voluminous data on the care they provide. The federal government uses the data to calculate quality measures and posts them on a federal website, along with inspection results and staffing information. But the rules don’t apply to the VA.

Playing ‘hide the ball’ with nursing home data

The VA has used similar data internally to track quality at its nursing homes as far back as 2011, according to a report in October that year from the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office. At that point, the agency monitored at least two dozen factors, including how many residents had bedsores or were in serious pain. But none of the information was released.

The 2011 review found that 80 percent of the agency’s nursing homes had problems with medication management, but VA headquarters wasn’t using the data “ to detect patterns and trends in the quality of care and quality of life within a (VA nursing home) or across many (of them).”

The VA launched another tracking system in May 2016. It now measures 11 indicators – the same as those used for private nursing homes – and assigns star ratings based on the indicators, which can be clues to larger problems with overall quality. For example, high rates of falls or bedsores may indicate neglect.

Continue to full article>

BedsoreHotline Treatment & Lawsuit booklet>

Worst States If You’re Caring For An Aging Parent

Via FA-Magazine  

#7 In Survey New York Stateimage.png

Some states make it harder for those caring for an aging parent, according to a new survey. 

Caring.com conducted a national survey to determine which states offer the best overall cost of living, and accessibility to senior support programs and resources for caregivers. 

While some states were praised for providing an affordable and helpful environment for caregivers, other states inevitable ended up at the bottom of the list.

“It hasn’t always been so expensive, but the cost of caring for our parents is so out of control now that it has the capacity to actually bankrupt families,” Jim Miller, a senior advocate and author of SavvySenior.org, said in the report. “I think that’s why it’s so important to consider these costs far in advance of needing to provide care so you’re prepared instead of panicked.”

These 10 states, in descending order, were deemed the most expensive for caregivers by Caring.com:

10. Maine

While the state is expensive for seniors, the availability of senior care support and services ranked 13th overall. The median cost for a home health aide was $4,500 more than the national average. Nursing home expenses were $24,00 more than the national average, according to caring.com.

 

9. New Hampshire

The state ranked 44th for cost of living. Costs for a nursing home stay for a year were over $100,000, well above the national average. The state did rank well for offering accessible senior programs and caregiver resources.

8. Delaware

For your aging parent to live in a nursing home in Delaware, expect to pay the median price of $127,750. The state ranked 28th in the survey for senior and caregiver programs and support.

 

7. New York

Earning a good rank for senior support and services, the state offers numerous resources for caregivers and seniors. While the costs for a home health aide and assisted living are competitive, the median for a nursing home is well above the national average by over $40,000.

Read More>

 

New Federal Law Helps To Prevent Elder Abuse

A new federal law is designed to address the growing problem of elder abuse. The law supports efforts to better understand, prevent, and combat both financial and physical elder abuse.

cropped-gavel17

The prevalence of elder abuse is hard to calculate because it is underreported, but according to the National Council on Aging, approximately 1 in 10 Americans age 60 or older have experienced some form of elder abuse. In 2011, a MetLife study estimated that older Americans are losing $2.9 billion annually to elder financial abuse.

The bipartisan Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act of 2017 authorizes the Department of Justice (DOJ) to take steps to combat elder abuse. Under the new law, the federal government must do the following:

  • Create an elder justice coordinator position in federal judicial districts, at the DOJ, and at the Federal Trade Commission
  • Implement comprehensive training on elder abuse for Federal Bureau of Investigation agents
  • Operate a resource group to assist prosecutors in pursuing elder abuse cases

The law requires the DOJ to collect data on elder abuse and investigations as well as provide training and support to states to fight elder abuse. The law specifically targets email fraud by expanding the definition of telemarketing fraud to include email fraud. Prohibited actions include email solicitations for investment for financial profit, participation in a business opportunity, or commitment to a loan.

The law also addresses flaws in the guardianship system that have led to elder abuse. The law enables the government to provide demonstration grants to states’ highest courts to assess adult guardianship and conservatorship proceedings and implement changes.

“Exploiting and defrauding seniors is cowardly, and these crimes should be addressed as the reprehensible acts they are,” said Senator Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), a co-sponsor of the legislation, adding that the legislation “sends a clear signal from Congress that combating elder abuse and exploitation should be top priority for law enforcement.”

For more information about the law, click here and here.

Senior Citizens update: Puerto Rico. Hurricanes effect on elders

After a lifetime of agricultural work on the U.S. mainland, Ausberto Maldonado retired home to a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. But he has diabetes, and especially since Hurricane Maria, has been struggling to get by.
Sarah Varney/Kaiser Health News
Straddled across Ausberto Maldonado’s backyard in Bayamon, Puerto Rico, a suburb of San Juan, is a nagging reminder of Hurricane Maria’s destructive power.

“See, that tree broke off that branch, which is as thick as a tree — and now it’s in my yard,” says Maldonado, a 65-year-old retiree.

Rats scurry from under the downed tree, preventing Maldonado from hanging his laundry. To get the tree removed, he must show up in person at a local government office. But the diabetic ulcers on his feet make it painful to walk.

After a lifetime of work on the U.S. mainland picking corn and asparagus and processing chickens in poultry plants, Maldonado returned to Puerto Rico a decade ago to help care for his ailing mother, who has since died. Today the retiree finds himself living day-to-day on the island. He receives $280 a month in Social Security and $89 a month in food stamps — or about $3 a day for food.

Six months after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico and its economy, the daily indignities are piling up, especially for people who are frail or elderly. Many are finding their current economic straits nearly as threatening as the storm.

Complaints About Nursing Home Evictions Rise, and Regulators Take Note

From The New York Times:

One reason for the evictions, legal
advocates say, is that the residents’
better-paying Medicare coverage is
ending and will be replaced by Medicaid.

Full Article>

Helpful and Free easy-to-read Legal Guides for Senior Citizens.

Written in easy to understand language

free legal guides

Bedsores Reference Guide: Lawsuit, Medical, and Treatment information

Have bedsores reached epidemic proportions yet? To many it seems so — especially in elders that are in hospitals and nursing homes — and they do not have to be incapacitated or totally immobile to be at risk.

Whether or not you or an elder in your family has unfortunately become a victim of a bedsore, pressure ulcer, or decubitus ulcer keep this handy reference guide available. Download it to you computer, cell phone or bookmark it. Because bedsores can happen extremely fast and catch you off guard. They can progress rapidly, even within hours if proper care and medical attention are not given.

Anyone with an elder family member entering a hospital, nursing home or even a skilled nursing facility for a short term stay should read and help prevent these potential life treating wounds from happening to a loved one. They can occur at even the best hospitals with the best doctors. You may not expect malpractice, but it happens. You may not expect neglect but it happens. It happens to tens of thousands of innocent patients.

Lawsuits can yield millions of dollars to the victim and their family.

Understaffing, inadequate training, changes in shifts, or simply a scenario where your loved one in a nursing home may need care but that care is given to others with a more acute immediate need. It’s at these times that the elder is at extreme risk.

You can read more about risk factors, treatment, and lawsuits to be compensated for pain, suffering or loss of life here. Reference Guide>

Screen Shot 2018-01-13 at 12.17.17 PM

Additional information on bedsores from Medical News Today>

More Facts About Your Legal Rights>

%d bloggers like this: