Article: Nursing Homes Routinely Mask Low Staff Levels

Via New York Times By Jordan Rau

ITHACA, N.Y. — Most nursing homes had fewer nurses and caretaking staff than they had reported to the government for years, according to new federal data, bolstering the long-held suspicions of many families that staffing levels were often inadequate.

The records for the first time reveal frequent and significant fluctuations in day-to-day staffing, with particularly large shortfalls on weekends. On the worst staffed days at an average facility, the new data show, on-duty personnel cared for nearly twice as many residents as they did when the staffing roster was fullest.

The data, analyzed by Kaiser Health News, come from daily payroll records Medicare only recently began gathering and publishing from more than 14,000 nursing homes, as required by the Affordable Care Act of 2010. Medicare previously had been rating each facility’s staffing levels based on the homes’ own unverified reports, making it possible to game the system.

The payroll records provide the strongest evidence that over the last decade, the government’s five-star rating system for nursing homes often exaggerated staffing levels and rarely identified the periods of thin staffing that were common. Medicare is now relying on the new data to evaluate staffing, but the revamped star ratings still mask the erratic levels of people working from day to day.

Stan Hugo with his wife, Donna, who is a resident at the Beechtree 
Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing in Ithaca, N.Y. Mr. Hugo 
tracks staffing levels at the skilled nursing facility.

At the Beechtree Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing here, Jay Vandemark, 47, who had a stroke last year, said he often roams the halls looking for an aide not already swamped with work when he needs help putting on his shirt.

Especially on weekends, he said, “It’s almost like a ghost town.”

Nearly 1.4 million people are cared for in skilled nursing facilities in the United States. When nursing homes are short of staff, nurses and aides scramble to deliver meals, ferry bedbound residents to the bathroom and answer calls for pain medication. Essential medical tasks such as repositioning a patient to avert bedsores can be overlooked when workers are overburdened, sometimes leading to avoidable hospitalizations.

Nursing Home Abuse Lawsuits >

“Volatility means there are gaps in care,” said David Stevenson, an associate professor of health policy at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. “It’s not like the day-to-day life of nursing home residents and their needs vary substantially on a weekend and a weekday. They need to get dressed, to bathe and to eat every single day.”

David Gifford, a senior vice president at the American Health Care Association, a nursing home trade group, disagreed, saying there are legitimate reasons staffing varies. On weekends, for instance, there are fewer activities for residents and more family members around, he said.

“While staffing is important, what really matters is what the overall outcomes are,” he said.

While Medicare does not set a minimum resident-to-staff ratio, it does require the presence of a registered nurse for eight hours a day and a licensed nurse at all times.

The payroll records show that even facilities that Medicare rated positively for staffing levels on its Nursing Home Compare website, including Beechtree, were short nurses and aides on some days. On its best staffed days, Beechtree had one aide for every eight residents, while on its lowest staffed days, there was only one aide for 18 residents. Nursing levels also varied.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the federal agency that oversees nursing home inspections, said in a statement that it “is concerned and taking steps to address fluctuations in staffing levels” that have emerged from the new data. This month, it said it would lower ratings for nursing homes that had gone seven or more days without a registered nurse.

Beechtree’s payroll records showed similar staffing levels to those it had reported before. David Camerota, chief operating officer of Upstate Services Group, the for-profit chain that owns Beechtree, said in a statement that the facility has enough nurses and aides to properly care for its 120 residents. But, he said, like other nursing homes, Beechtree is in “a constant battle” to recruit and retain employees even as it has increased pay to be more competitive.

Mr. Camerota wrote that weekend staffing is a special challenge as employees are guaranteed every other weekend off. “This impacts our ability to have as many staff as we would really like to have,” he wrote.

New rating method is still flawed

In April, the government started using daily payroll reports to calculate average staffing ratings, replacing the old method, which relied on homes to report staffing for the two weeks before an inspection. The homes sometimes anticipated when an inspection would happen and could staff up before it.

Payroll records at Beechtree show that on its highest staffed days, it had one aide for every eight residents, but there was only one aide for 18 residents at the lowest staffing level.CreditHeather Ainsworth for The New York Times

“They get burned out and they quit,” said Adam Chandler, whose mother lived at Beachtree until her death earlier this year. “It’s been constant turmoil, and it never ends.”

Medicare’s payroll records for the nursing homes showed that there were, on average, 11 percent fewer nurses providing direct care on weekends and 8 percent fewer aides. Staffing levels fluctuated substantially during the week as well, when an aide at a typical home might have to care for as few as nine residents or as many as 14.

 

A family council forms

Beechtree actually gets its best Medicare rating in the category of staffing, with four stars. (Its inspection citations and the frequency of declines in residents’ health dragged its overall star rating down to two of five.)

To Stan Hugo, a retired math teacher whose wife, Donna, 80, lives at Beechtree, staffing levels have long seemed inadequate. In 2017, he and a handful of other residents and family members became so dissatisfied that they formed a council to scrutinize the home’s operation. Medicare requires nursing home administrators to listen to such councils’ grievances and recommendations.

Sandy Ferreira, who makes health care decisions for Effie Hamilton, a blind resident, said Ms. Hamilton broke her arm falling out of bed and has been hospitalized for dehydration and septic shock.

“Almost every problem we’ve had on the floor is one that could have been alleviated with enough and well-trained staff,” Mrs. Ferreira said.

Beechtree declined to discuss individual residents, but said it had investigated these complaints and did not find inadequate staffing on those days. Mr. Camerota also said that Medicare does not count assistants it hires to handle the simplest duties like making beds.

In recent months, Mr. Camerota said, Beechtree “has made major strides in listening to and addressing concerns related to staffing at the facility.”

Mr. Hugo agreed that Beechtree has increased daytime staffing during the week under the prodding of his council. On nights and weekends, he said, it still remained too low.

His wife has Alzheimer’s, uses a wheelchair and no longer talks. She enjoys music, and Mr. Hugo placed earphones on her head so she could listen to her favorite singers as he spoon-fed her lunch in the dining room on a recent Sunday.

As he does each day he visits, he counted each nursing assistant he saw tending residents, took a photograph of the official staffing log in the lobby and compared it to what he had observed. While he fed his wife, he noted two aides for the 40 residents on the floor — half what Medicare says is average at Beechtree.

“Weekends are terrible,” he said. While he’s regularly there overseeing his wife’s care, he wondered: “What about all these other residents? They don’t have people who come in.”

This article was produced in collaboration with Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent program of the Kaiser Family Foundation. The author is a reporter for Kaiser Health News.
A version of this article appears in print on , on Page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Nursing Homes Routinely Mask Low Staff Levels. Order Reprints | Today’s Paper | Subscribe

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How To Spot Nursing Home Neglect Or Abuse?

justice engraved on courthouse

Nursing home neglect and abuse is often difficult to detect, and families should be on the lookout for common warning signs for physical, emotional and financial abuse.

Common warning signs of physical abuse are:

  • Untreated bedsores, pressure sores, wounds, cuts, bruises, or welts
  • Abnormally pale complexion
  • Bruises in a pattern that would suggest restraints
  • Excessive and sudden weight loss
  • Fleas, lice, or dirt on or in the room
  • Poor personal hygiene, unpleasant odors or other unattended health problems
  • Torn clothing or broken personal items
  • Bleeding around private parts
  • Bloody undergarments
  • Bruises around the breast/genital region
  • An unexpected look of fear from the elder when aide may be present

Common warning signs of emotional abuse are:

  • Intimidation through yelling and threats
  • Humiliation
  • Ignoring the patient
  • Isolating the patient from other residents and/or activities
  • Terrorizing the patient
  • Mocking the patient

Financial exploitation is another form of abuse. An unscrupulous caregiver may:

  • Misuse checks, accounts, or credit cards
  • Steal money, steal checks, or steal belongings
  • Forge signatures
  • Authorize withdrawals or transfer of monies
  • Steal the patient’s identity

No family is exempt from any of these possibilities. Abuse affects the rich and poor. Suffering sustained by the elderly ranges from financial, to emotional and physical. Abuse escalating to physical can result in severe infections, amputations, dehydration and, unfortunately, death. A lawsuit should be filed on behalf of your loved one to get the justice your family deserves. Compensation may cover the costs of treatment and recovery, as well as compensation for non-financial hardships such as pain and suffering.

If you suspect elder abuse of any kind speak up and demand answers of those in charge.

Feel free to contact me for more information or inquire about a lawsuit.

Sincerely,

Brian

Secret data: Most VA nursing homes have more residents with bed sores, pain, than private facilities

Via Donovan Slack, USA TODAY, and Andrea Estes, The Boston Globe

Don Ruch’s family thought round-the-clock care would help him recuperate, but he ended up in intensive care in septic shock, suffering from “severe” malnutrition, bedsores on his pelvis and back, a burn on his right thigh and a trauma wound. USA TODAY

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An analysis of internal documents shows residents at more than two-thirds of Department of Veterans Affairs nursing homes last year were more likely to have serious bedsores, as well as suffer serious pain, than their counterparts in private nursing homes across the country.

The analysis suggests large numbers of veterans suffered potential neglect or medication mismanagement and provides a fuller picture of the state of care in the 133 VA nursing homes that serve 46,000 sick and infirm military veterans each year.

More than 100 VA nursing homes scored worse than private nursing homes on a majority of key quality indicators, which include rates of infection and decline in daily living skills, according to the analysis of data withheld by the VA from public view but obtained by USA TODAY and The Boston Globe.

The news organizations reported last week that 60 VA nursing homes received the agency’s lowest quality ranking of one out of five stars last year, but the data didn’t detail how individual facilities scored on specific measures. USA TODAY and The Globe are now publishing the full data, outlined in internal documents, for every VA nursing facility as of Dec. 31, 2017.

Four VA facilities – nursing homes in Bedford, Massachusetts; Chillicothe, Ohio; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Roseburg, Oregon – lagged private nursing home averages on 10 of 11 indicators. At all four, about a third of residents were given anti-psychotic drugs – almost twice as much as in the private sector. The FDA has said such drugs are associated with an increased risk of death in elderly patients with dementia.

“They should be assessing individuals and doing what they can to manage it,” said Robyn Grant, director of public policy and advocacy at the National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care. “And if it’s not working, they should be trying different things.”

The VA, which has argued that its residents are typically sicker than those in private facilities, has tracked the detailed quality data for more than two years but has kept it secret, depriving veterans of potentially crucial health care information.

VA ‘evaluating’ what information to release

VA Press Secretary Curt Cashour has declined to answer questions about whether or when the agency planned to release the quality information, as well as nursing home staff data the VA has compiled dating to 2004. He also declined to say when the VA would release inspection reports the agency has kept secret for more than a decade.

After the investigative report by USA TODAY and The Globe last week, Louisiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy and Alabama Democratic Sen. Doug Jones introduced legislation that would force the VA to release all of its nursing home quality information at least once a year.

“We cannot work with this administration or any administration to fix the VA if we don’t have the information,’’ Jones said.

Acting VA Secretary Peter O’Rourke told the CBS affiliate in Dallas last week that VA officials were “evaluating exactly what is the most appropriate for us to put out there and that will support continuous improvement and then also will provide good decision-making information for veterans.”

He called the USA TODAY and Globe reporting on the VA nursing home ratings “fake news.”

Federal regulations require private nursing homes to disclose voluminous data on the care they provide. The federal government uses the data to calculate quality measures and posts them on a federal website, along with inspection results and staffing information. But the rules don’t apply to the VA.

Playing ‘hide the ball’ with nursing home data

The VA has used similar data internally to track quality at its nursing homes as far back as 2011, according to a report in October that year from the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office. At that point, the agency monitored at least two dozen factors, including how many residents had bedsores or were in serious pain. But none of the information was released.

The 2011 review found that 80 percent of the agency’s nursing homes had problems with medication management, but VA headquarters wasn’t using the data “ to detect patterns and trends in the quality of care and quality of life within a (VA nursing home) or across many (of them).”

The VA launched another tracking system in May 2016. It now measures 11 indicators – the same as those used for private nursing homes – and assigns star ratings based on the indicators, which can be clues to larger problems with overall quality. For example, high rates of falls or bedsores may indicate neglect.

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WHEN IT COMES TO BEDSORES, PRESSURE SORES, DECUBITUS ULCERS IT’S OFTEN HELPFUL TO READ WHAT OTHERS HAVE ASKED. YOU MAY BE ABLE TO BENEFIT FROM SOME OF OUR FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS BELOW.

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Pressure sores: Causes, treatment, and prevention

Informative medical information: 

Via MEDICAL NEWS TODAY, By Christian Nordqvist

Pressure sores can affect people who spend a long time in one position, for example, because of paralysis, illness, old age, or frailty.

Also known as pressure ulcers and bedsores, pressure sores can happen when there is friction or unrelieved pressure on one part of the body.

People who cannot make even small movements are at risk of pressure sores.

The sores can affect any part of the body, but the bony areas around the elbows, knees, heels, coccyx, and ankles are more susceptible.

Bedsores are treatable, but, if treatment comes too late, they can lead to fatal complications.

The prevalence of pressure sores in intensive care units in the United States (U.S.) is estimated to range from 16.6 percent to 20.7 percent.

Fast facts on pressure soresHere are some key points about pressure sores. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  • Pressure sores, pressure ulcers, or bedsores commonly affect people who cannot move easily.
  • They are more likely to affect the bony parts of the body.
  • The sores develop in stages. Identifying them in the early stage enables treatment and reduces the risk of complications.
  • Moving patients frequently is key to preventing pressure sores.

Symptoms

[Pressure sores]There are varying stages of severity of pressure sore.

Pressure ulcers can affect patients who are unable to move because of paralysis, illness, or old age.

Bed-bound patients are most at risk of developing bedsores on the bony parts of their body, such as the ankles, heels, shoulders, coccyx or tailbone, elbows, and the back of the head.

Patients who use a wheelchair have a higher risk of developing pressure sores on their:

  • buttocks and tailbone
  • spine
  • shoulder blades
  • back of arms or legs

Pressure sores develop in four stages.

  1. The skin will look red and feel warm to the touch. It may be itchy.
  2. There may be a painful open sore or a blister, with discolored skin around it.
  3. A crater-like appearance develops, due to tissue damage below the skin’s surface.
  4. Severe damage to skin and tissue, possibly with infection. Muscles, bones, and tendons may be visible.

An infected sore takes longer to heal, and the infection can spread elsewhere in the body.

Causes and risk factors

Anyone who stays in one place for a long time and who cannot change position without help is at risk of developing pressure sores. The ulcers can develop and progress rapidly, and they can be difficult to heal.

Sustained pressure can cut off circulation to vulnerable parts of the body. Without an adequate supply of blood, body tissues can die.

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, a sore can develop if blood supply is cut off for more than 2 to 3 hours.

Pressure ulcers are usually caused by:

Continuous pressure: if there is pressure on the skin on one side, and bone on the other, the skin and underlying tissue may not receive an adequate blood supply.

Friction: For some patients, especially those with thin, frail skin and poor circulation, turning and moving may damage the skin, raising the risk of bedsores.

Shear: If the skin moves one way while the underlying bone moves in the opposite direction, there is a risk of shearing. Cell walls and minute blood vessels may stretch and tear.

This can happen if a patient slides down a bed or a chair, or if the top half of the bed is raised too high.

Injured tissue can develop an infection. This can spread, leading to serious illness.

Risk factors

[Pressure sores immobility]Pressure sores mainly affect those who are less mobile, or restricted to one position, such as older people or those with mobility impairments.

Pressure ulcers are more common among those who:

  • are immobilized because of injury, illness, or sedation
  • have long-term spinal cord injuries

Patients with long-term spinal cord injuries or neuropathic conditions, including diabetes, have reduced sensation.

They may not feel a bedsore developing, so they continue to lie on it, making it worse.

Patients who cannot move specific parts of their body unaided have a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers.

Factors that increase the risk include:

  • Older age as skin gets thinner and more vulnerable with age
  • Reduced pain perception, due, for example, to a spinal cord or other injury, as they may not notice the sore
  • Poor blood circulation, due to diabetes, vascular diseases, smoking, and compression
  • Poor diet, especially with a lack of protein, vitamin C, and zinc
  • Reduced mental awareness, due to a disease, injury, or medication, can reduce the patient’s ability to take preventive action
  • Incontinence of urine or feces can cause areas of permanently moist skin, increasing the risk of skin breakdown and damage

A low or high body mass index (BMI) increases the risk.

A person with a low body weight will have less padding around their bones, while those with obesity can develop sores in unusual places. Studies show that people with a BMI of 30 to 39.9 have a 1.5 times higher rate of developing pressure ulcers.

Diagnosis, treatment, and management

[Pressure sores relief]Placing a pillow under the affected area can help to alleviate pressure and symptoms.

A doctor will diagnose a pressure ulcer through a visual examination.

The physician will ask about recent medical history and they will check the size and shape of the sore, and if there is any oozing or weeping.

If the patient is not in residential care, a doctor may teach them how to carry out regular daily checks on themselves.

People should report any sign of a pressure sore to the doctor.

Treatment

Treating pressure ulcers is not easy.

An open wound is unlikely to heal rapidly. Even when healing does take place, it may be inconsistent, because of the damage to skin and other tissues.

Less severe pressure ulcers often heal within a few weeks with proper treatment, but serious wounds may need surgery.

The following steps should be taken:

  • Remove the pressure from the sore by moving the patient or using foam pads or pillows to prop up parts of the body.
  • Clean the wound: Minor wounds may be gently washed with water and a mild soap. Open sores need to be cleaned with a saline solution each time the dressing is changed.
  • Control incontinence as far as possible.
  • Remove dead tissue: A wound does not heal well if dead or infected tissue is present, so debridement is necessary.
  • Apply dressings: These protect the wound and accelerate healing. Some dressings help prevent infection by dissolving dead tissue.
  • Use oral antibiotics or antibiotic cream: These will can help treat an infection.

In the early stages, people may treat ulcers at home, but more severe ulcers will need dressing by a health care professional.

Negative pressure wound therapy

Also known as vacuum-assisted therapy, this procedure involves the attachment of a suction tube to the bedsore. The tube draws moisture from the ulcer, drastically improving the healing time and reducing the risk of infection.

Wounds heal within around 6 weeks at half the cost of surgery.

Surgery

Some bedsores may become so severe that surgical intervention is necessary.

Surgery aims to clean the sore, treat or prevent infection, reduce fluid loss, and lower the risk of further complications.

A pad of muscle, skin, or other tissue from the patient’s body is used to cover the wound and cushion the affected bone. This is known as flap reconstruction.

Prevention

Even with excellent medical and nursing care, bedsores can be hard to prevent, especially among vulnerable patients.

Preventing bedsores is easier than treating them, but this too can be challenging.

Tips to reduce the risk of a bed sore developing include:

  • moving the patient at least every 15 minutes for wheelchair users and at every 2 hours for people in bed
  • daily skin inspections
  • keeping the skin healthy and dry
  • maintaining good nutrition, to enhance overall health and wound healing
  • quitting smoking
  • exercises, even if they must be carried out in bed, with assistance, as they improve circulation.

Patients should mention any possible bed sores to their health care worker or doctor.

A physical therapist can advise on the most appropriate positions to avoid pressure sores.

Complications

[Pressure sores cellulitis]Cellulitis is a possible complication of bed sores.

Without treatment, bed sores can lead to serious complications.

Cellulitis is a potentially life-threatening bacterial infection of the skin, from the surface to the deepest layer of skin. Cellulitis can result in septicemia, or blood poisoning, and the infection can spread to other parts of the body.

Bone and joint infections can arise if a pressure ulcer spreads to the joints or bones. This can result in damage to cartilage and tissue, and a reduction in limb and joint function.

Sepsis, in which bacteria can enter through sores, especially advanced ones, and infect the bloodstream. This can lead to shock and organ failure, a life-threatening condition.

There is a higher risk of developing an aggressive Cancer in the skin’s squamous cells if the patient has bedsores.

Outlook

Stage 2 bedsores can heal within 1 to 6 weeks, but ulcers that reach stage 3 or 4 may take several months, or they may never heal, especially in people with ongoing health problems.

With the appropriate measures, patients and medical staff can significantly reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcers.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

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New York City’s Safest And Most Dangerous Hospitals: Rankings

From New York City Patch: https://patch.com/new-york/new-york-city/new-york-citys-safest-most-dangerous-hospitals-rankings By

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NEW YORK, NY — Going to certain hospitals in New York City may do more harm than good, according to new batch of hospital safety rankings released Wednesday. Of the city’s 41 hospitals graded by the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit founded by employers and healthcare providers, 34 hospitals received a grade of “C” or below.

Yikes.

To paint an even uglier picture, zero of the city’s hospitals received an “A” grade; that’s down from 2 hospitals that received an “A” in the Leapfrog Group’s 2016 fall safety rankings. If you live by the “Cs get degrees” theory, the majority of the city’s hospitals would still get passing grades — but not by much. In total, seven hospitals got a grade of “B,” 23 got a grade of “C,” nine got a grade of “D” and two got a grade of “F.”

The hospitals that failed were SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn and Flushing Hospital Medical Center in Queens, according to the Leapfrog rankings. (For more New York City news delivered straight to your inbox sign up for Patch’s free newsletters and breaking news alerts.)

Leapfrog looks at medical errors, accidents, injuries and infections when calculating its grades, according to the ranking methodology. The goal of the rankings is to determine a patient’s risk of further injury or infection is if they visit a certain hospital.

According to the organization, more than 1,000 Americans die each day from preventable hospital errors. Hospitals given a B rating by Leapfrog had a 9 percent higher risk of avoidable death than A hospitals. That number jumps to 35 percent in C hospitals.

Cross your fingers and look for your hospital’s grade below:

  1. NYU Langone Medical Center (Manhattan): B
  2. NYC Health + Hospitals – Bellevue (Manhattan): C
  3. Mount Sinai West (Manhattan): D
  4. Mount Sinai Beth Israel (Manhattan): C
  5. New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center (Manhattan): C
  6. Northwell Health System – Lenox Hill Hospital (Manhattan): C
  7. The Mount Sinai Hospital (Manhattan): C
  8. NYC Health + Hospitals – Metropolitan (Manhattan) : B
  9. Mount Sinai (Queens): C
  10. Mount Sinai St. Luke’s (Manhattan): D
  11. The Brooklyn Hospital Center (Brooklyn): C
  12. NYC Health + Hospitals – Woodhull (Brooklyn): B
  13. Wyckoff Heights Medical Center (Brookyln): C
  14. NYC Health + Hospitals – Harlem (Manhattan): B
  15. NYC Health + Hospitals – Elmhurst (Queens): D
  16. New York Methodist Hospital (Brooklyn): D
  17. NYC Health + Hospitals – Lincoln (Bronx): B
  18. New York-Presbyterian Hospital Columbia University Medical Center (Manhattan): C
  19. NYC Health + Hospitals – Kings County (Brooklyn): C
  20. Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center (Brooklyn): C
  21. SUNY Downstate Medical Center (Brooklyn): F
  22. Maimonides Medical Center (Brooklyn): D
  23. Long Island Jewish Forest Hills Hospital (Queens): C
  24. Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center Concourse Campus (Bronx): C
  25. Brookdale Hospital Medical Center (Brooklyn): D
  26. New York-Presbyterian (Queens): C
  27. St. Barnabas Hospital (Bronx): D
  28. Flushing Hospital Medical Center (Queens): F
  29. New York-Presbyterian The Allen Hospital (Manhattan): C
  30. Mount Sinai (Brooklyn): C
  31. New York Community Hospital (Brooklyn): C
  32. Richmond University Medical Center (Staten Island): D
  33. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center (Queens): D
  34. NYC Health + Hospitals – Queens (Queens): B
  35. Montefiore Einstein Campus (Bronx): C
  36. NYC Health + Hospitals – Jacobi (Bronx): C
  37. NYC Health + Hospitals – North Central Bronx (Bronx): B
  38. Montefiore Moses Campus (Bronx): C
  39. NYC Health + Hospitals – Coney Island (Brooklyn): C
  40. Montefiore Wakefield Campus (Bronx): C
  41. Northwell Health System – Staten Island University Hospital (Staten Island): C

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images News/Getty Images

“My mom is in a nursing home and I noticed some bruises and sores. I think they are bedsores—what should I do?”

Bedsores are often a sign of neglect and sometimes a sign of abuse. The first thing you should do is speak to a nurse on duty and begin to remedy the situation. Be aware that the nurse may not have a full understanding of these injuries and you will likely need the attention of a wound care specialist and medical doctor. If you have a cell phone take some pictures of the wound for documentation. Bedsores and Pressure Sores, also known as Decubitus Ulcers can progress quickly and can be deadly. They occur when someone is immobile and there is not adequate blood flow. Then the affected tissue dies and an ulcerated sore develops. In a nursing home, hospital or other care facility it is their responsibility to check and turn the patient regularly. There are laws in place that protect patients and you should know that these injuries are not the fault of the patient. The patient is the victim. If a loved one you know is suffering they may have a significant, financially rewarding lawsuit. Read more about this on our website, http://www.RaphanLaw.com.

As an Elder Law firm we see these cases often. Whether malpractice, abuse or neglect it is simply unjust for it to happen to an innocent victim. Do not put off addressing the issue. Call me for a free consultation (212-268-8200, 800-278-2960) or even to just guide you through the process of getting the proper medical and legal attention.

Visual Stages of Bedsores:

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Read our Frequently Asked Bedsore Lawsuit Questions here>

By Brian A. Raphan, Esq.

Jury awards family $1 million in lawsuit against Beachwood nursing home

Mandatory sentencing laws keep U.S. judges' hands tied
The family of a former resident of Beachwood Pointe Care Center has won a $1 million lawsuit against the nursing home. (Eli Saslow, Washington Post)
By Bob Sandrick, special to cleveland.com 

BEACHWOOD, Ohio — A jury has awarded the family of a former Beachwood nursing home resident $1 million in a lawsuit filed more than two and a half years ago.

The resident, 71-year-old Mary L. Stevens, died in May 2012 at Beachwood Pointe Care Center on Chagrin Boulevard. She suffered infected pressure wounds, or bedsores, caused by “negligence and recklessness” of the nursing home staff, according to the lawsuit, filed in March 2013 by The Dickson Firm LLC in Beachwood.

The verdict came Wednesday in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. The jury awarded David P. Lang, on behalf of Stevens, $560,000 in punitive damages and $440,000 in compensatory damages, according to the electronic court docket.

In addition to suffering from bedsores , Stevens also sustained “severe” and “fatal” injuries while at Beachwood Pointe, according to the lawsuit. Nursing home staff allowed her to become “very ill” and her condition deteriorated.

Beachwood Pointe did not tell Stevens’ family about her condition. Decisions about her medical care were made by non-medical staff, the lawsuit says, adding that the nursing home’s staffing levels and supervision were inadequate, and it failed to give Stevens palatable food.

Officials from Beachwood Pointe did not return calls Tuesday. Its attorney could not be reached about whether the nursing home would appeal the verdict.

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Probate, Estate Planning, Healthcare Proxies, Medicaid Planning, etc. Get informed and find many of the answers to your existing questions in these guides. Download and save as reference for free.

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