Are Medicare Advantage Plans Steering Enrollees to Lower-Quality Nursing Homes?

A recent study has found that people enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan were more likely to enter a lower-quality nursing home than were people in traditional Medicare. The study raises questions about whether Medicare Advantage plans are influencing beneficiaries’ decisionmaking when it comes to choosing a nursing home. Medicare Advantage plans, an alternative to traditional Medicare, are provided by private insurers rather than the federal government.

The government pays Medicare Advantage plans a fixed monthly fee to provide services to each Medicare beneficiary under their care, and the services must at least be equal to regular Medicare’s. While the plans sometimes offer benefits that original Medicare does not, the plans usually only cover care provided by doctors in their network or charge higher rates for out-of-network care. The study, conducted by researchers at Brown University School of Public Health, examined Medicare beneficiaries entering nursing homes between 2012 and 2014. Using Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare website as the measure of quality, the study found that beneficiaries in Medicare Advantage plans tended to enter lower quality nursing homes than beneficiaries in original Medicare.

This was true even when the researchers took into account the beneficiaries’ distance from the nursing home and other decision factors. Even beneficiaries enrolled in highly rated Medicare Advantage plans were more likely to enter a low-quality nursing home compared to original Medicare beneficiaries. The study does not draw any conclusions about whether the Medicare Advantage beneficiaries fared worse than original Medicare beneficiaries, only that they tended to enter facilities that had higher re-hospitalization rates and worse outcomes. The study concluded that Medicare Advantage plans may be influencing beneficiary decisionmaking around nursing home selection. According to Skilled Nursing News, one of the study’s authors speculated that a Medicare Advantage plan “might be incentivized to send patients to a given nursing home regardless of what the quality ratings are, because of a relationship with that nursing home or because they have a lot of patients in that nursing home and can better manage their care.”

Information on exactly why this is happening is “of vital policy importance,” according to the study’s authors. They recommend gathering more information about Medicare Advantage nursing home claims and re-hospitalization rates and requiring Medicare Advantage plans to be more transparent about the quality of nursing homes in their networks.

To read the study click here.

 

Copyright 2016 This article is provided as legal information, not legal advice and our law firm makes no claims, promises or guarantees about the accuracy,completeness, or adequacy of the information contained in in this article. The distribution or acceptance of this article does not constitute an attorney-client relationship with our law firm.

Pressure Ulcers: What You Should Do If You See Them on Your Loved One In A Hospital

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The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) defines a pressure ulcer as a “localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear.” Illustrations of common locations of pressure ulcers are shown below:
LOCATIONS PRESSURE SORES ENGLISH

These injuries can lead to further medical problems, infections, sepsis, amputation and even death. Whether malpractice, abuse or neglect it is simply unjust and unnecessary for it to happen to an innocent patient.

Call today for a free consultation to find out the value of a lawsuit or for more information: 212-268-8200, or 800-278-2960

Read more at http://www.BedsoreHotline.com

Stages of Bedsores:

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Worst States If You’re Caring For An Aging Parent

Via FA-Magazine  

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Some states make it harder for those caring for an aging parent, according to a new survey. 

Caring.com conducted a national survey to determine which states offer the best overall cost of living, and accessibility to senior support programs and resources for caregivers. 

While some states were praised for providing an affordable and helpful environment for caregivers, other states inevitable ended up at the bottom of the list.

“It hasn’t always been so expensive, but the cost of caring for our parents is so out of control now that it has the capacity to actually bankrupt families,” Jim Miller, a senior advocate and author of SavvySenior.org, said in the report. “I think that’s why it’s so important to consider these costs far in advance of needing to provide care so you’re prepared instead of panicked.”

These 10 states, in descending order, were deemed the most expensive for caregivers by Caring.com:

10. Maine

While the state is expensive for seniors, the availability of senior care support and services ranked 13th overall. The median cost for a home health aide was $4,500 more than the national average. Nursing home expenses were $24,00 more than the national average, according to caring.com.

 

9. New Hampshire

The state ranked 44th for cost of living. Costs for a nursing home stay for a year were over $100,000, well above the national average. The state did rank well for offering accessible senior programs and caregiver resources.

8. Delaware

For your aging parent to live in a nursing home in Delaware, expect to pay the median price of $127,750. The state ranked 28th in the survey for senior and caregiver programs and support.

 

7. New York

Earning a good rank for senior support and services, the state offers numerous resources for caregivers and seniors. While the costs for a home health aide and assisted living are competitive, the median for a nursing home is well above the national average by over $40,000.

Read More>

 

How to Talk About Moving to a Retirement Home: ‘It’s a Journey’

Having a conversation about moving — whether it’s with a relative,
even a spouse — brings up lots of anxiety. Here’s how to go about it.

Medicaid Applicants & Home Care: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Clarifies Penalty Period Start Date

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has clarified when a transfer penalty begins for Medicaid applicants who are seeking home and community-based services. The penalty period begins when the applicant would begin receiving services were it not for the penalty period.

Brian Raphan, P.C.

After Congress passed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (DRA), CMS issued a guidance letter that a penalty period would not start to run until the date the “individual is eligible for Medicaid and is receiving institutional level of care services” [emphasis added]. But home and community-based services only become “services” once applicants are enrolled in the state’s waiver program and Medicaid is providing coverage. This caused a “Catch-22” for Medicaid applicants who were applying for home and community-based waivers: The penalty period would not begin to run until the applicants began receiving waiver services, but the applicants could not begin to receive waiver services until the penalty had run.

On April 17, 2018, CMS finally issued a new guidance letter, changing the start date of the penalty period to the date the “individual is eligible for medical assistance under the State plan and would otherwisebe receiving institutional level [of] care services” (emphasis added). This means that an applicant for home and community-based services will be eligible once the applicant meets the financial and non-financial requirements for Medicaid eligibility and the level-of-care requirements.

8 Common Mistakes in Medicaid Planning>

 

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